Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

The "Burning Times"


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
23 replies to this topic

#1 Cairelle

Cairelle

    GiGi Extraordinaire

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,350 posts

Posted 28 October 2007 - 12:59 PM

After reading Anjel's post about witchcraft in France, I started googling and came across a link about 40 witches who were executed in Toulouse, France in 1557. My family directly links back to Toulouse, which I found quite interesting! In surfing around looking for info on that, I came across this (rather odd) link that dispels some myths about the supposed "burning times", and wanted to share it.

http://www.insteadof...rAttack/p21.htm

I DO believe that witches have been executed over the centuries, but I also believe that the numbers have been vastly overstated. Either way, it's an interesting little read...

“People don’t live in New Orleans because it is easy. They live here because they are incapable of living anywhere else in the just same way.” – Ian McNulty, A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina


#2 AnjelWolf

AnjelWolf

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 8,650 posts

Posted 28 October 2007 - 01:01 PM

True....while many were common folks...several WERE witches. This link is interesting.

#3 LadyHawk

LadyHawk

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,091 posts

Posted 28 October 2007 - 01:11 PM

Yes interesting. There have been many such 'aclaimed' pieces of work over the years which have proved to be forgeries. Undoubtedly witches/healers whatever, were killed during that period but I agree, the numbers were hugely exaggerated.
LadyHawk x

#4 arabi

arabi

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,315 posts

Posted 28 October 2007 - 01:25 PM

Thanks for this. Its a very interesting read. Good 'ol google:)
Somewhere, however far or near, there is something very dark and grim hurtling toward each one of us. We just don't know when it will hit. Then, quite suddenly, it won't be all right at all.

#5 stormywitch

stormywitch

    Member

  • Inactive
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts

Posted 28 October 2007 - 02:20 PM

i found the link very interesting...french exacutions of witches is an intense part of our history and thought the link had some interesting info.....lol...my mid daughter is named after Katherine Desha" lol...only witch to survive the exacutions of france

#6 Guest_Sandra_*

Guest_Sandra_*
  • Guests

Posted 29 October 2007 - 03:24 PM


I DO believe that witches have been executed over the centuries, but I also believe that the numbers have been vastly overstated.


Now that is an enormous understatement. lol
That part of history was about the authorities exerting power over the common folk - not about who really was or wasn't a witch. If you believe the numbers, or evenr emotely close to the numbers claimed, then Europe was basically filled to the brim with witches. The pope would've had to be a witch, just to fill the claimed quotas. :shock: :)


#7 Guest_Rebie_*

Guest_Rebie_*
  • Guests

Posted 29 October 2007 - 09:21 PM

That part of history was about the authorities exerting power over the common folk - not about who really was or wasn't a witch. If you believe the numbers, or evenr emotely close to the numbers claimed, then Europe was basically filled to the brim with witches. The pope would've had to be a witch, just to fill the claimed quotas. :shock: :)


Yes, the witchhunts and trials were about power and greed. Most ppl accused of witchcraft were not witches at all. They either made someone mad, or they had property or money the courts or accusers wanted.
Rebie


#8 Guest_Sandra_*

Guest_Sandra_*
  • Guests

Posted 30 October 2007 - 09:51 AM

Exactly.
It was wonderfully convenient really. The neighbour was too pretty and your husband looked her way too often. You cried 'witch!' and off she was escorted. No need for messy revenge tactics.


#9 Tana

Tana

    Earth Mother

  • Moderators
  • 3,811 posts

Posted 30 October 2007 - 08:20 PM

Witchfinders were paid by the head! They were therefore bound to create a market, weren't they!
)0( Tana )o(

If I break faith with thee, may the skies fall upon me, the seas drown me, and the earth rise up and swallow me.

#10 soap fairy

soap fairy

    fluffy chaos instigator

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,200 posts

Posted 30 October 2007 - 10:10 PM

If anyones interested in this topic its well worth looking at the history of medicine as well because its funny how so much of the witch trials were linked to the gradual masculisation of the medical proffession .
Simillarly the effect of things such as mass ergotism of rye poisioning which was thought to be a factor in several of the early American incidents .
By the way if you really want to irritate a born again point out to them that pre- king james bible the line actually read 'thou shalt not suffer a poisoner to live ...' King james had it changed because he was paranoid that scottish witches were out to get him!

:cloud9: floating through life on a cloud of bubbles

#11 Leigh

Leigh

    Lover, Dreamer, Me

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,551 posts

Posted 30 October 2007 - 10:21 PM

Witchfinders were paid by the head! They were therefore bound to create a market, weren't they!


And often paid by appropriating the accused's assets.


#12 soap fairy

soap fairy

    fluffy chaos instigator

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,200 posts

Posted 31 October 2007 - 02:09 AM

oooh I wonder if someone could take a leaf out of the aborigines books and claim them back !!!
:cloud9: floating through life on a cloud of bubbles

#13 StarChilde

StarChilde

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 409 posts

Posted 31 October 2007 - 08:38 AM

I did a unit at university a few years ago, called "Witchcraft: Historical Images of Women". It was quite fascinating, we even had copies of some original documents and let me tell you reading that olde english was really hard.

We looked at the Witch Hunts in Europe and then did an in depth study of why "Salem" happened. I really enjoyed the unit, but discovering some of the out and out lies told regarding the 'millions' of women murdered by the Christians made me really angry. For a start the populations were so much lower back in the so called burning times that the number of supposed witches was impossible. I have also read over the years about all the English witches who were burned at the stake. WRONG. Witches in England were hanged, or died during their trials, they were never burned. (For those who were unaware, Scotland is NOT part of England).

Also, originally, the witches burned in Europe, were burned for the crime of Heresy, not witchcraft. It was later that witches were accused of worshipping the devil.


StarChilde


#14 soap fairy

soap fairy

    fluffy chaos instigator

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,200 posts

Posted 31 October 2007 - 06:16 PM

Thats pretty much how I got into it because when I was doing philosophy I spent some time doing christian mysticism and gnosticism most of which dates from that era .
If you want a really really scary read {given that its halloween } try and get hold of the translations of Torquemadas diaries {there are partial translations available }
That bloke was to put it bluntly madder than a box of soapy frogs !:wacko::wacko::wacko:

:cloud9: floating through life on a cloud of bubbles

#15 Guest_Adalwolfa_*

Guest_Adalwolfa_*
  • Guests

Posted 21 December 2007 - 05:16 PM

I am in no way Wiccan but I found this website last year, written by a highly educated woman who is out to debunk fluffy bunny wicca and tell some historical truths. She has a very good article on the Burning Times here
http://wicca.timerif...t/burning.shtml

You can read about her through a link at the top of the home page.


#16 wolfjan1

wolfjan1

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,871 posts

Posted 22 December 2007 - 12:11 AM

If anyones interested in this topic its well worth looking at the history of medicine as well because its funny how so much of the witch trials were linked to the gradual masculisation of the medical proffession .
Simillarly the effect of things such as mass ergotism of rye poisioning which was thought to be a factor in several of the early American incidents .
By the way if you really want to irritate a born again point out to them that pre- king james bible the line actually read 'thou shalt not suffer a poisoner to live ...' King james had it changed because he was paranoid that scottish witches were out to get him!

Yes, it's interesting to think that women who were once revered as medicine women were suddenly hunted human beings when the men of the times found that there was money in it. First they claimed that women, just by being women, weren't smart enough to give medical advice or cure naturally. Then they started accusing us of witchcraft and killing us off.
Mankind still has a great deal to answer for in its inhumanity to women.

It takes true arrogance to try and force ones' religion on another.

#17 circelilith

circelilith

    Ode to no one

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 704 posts

Posted 22 December 2007 - 08:43 AM

I think the thing that sickens me the most is not who they punished or the reasons why but how...doesnt it scare people to KNOW that some humans are so sick minded that they would torture someone so horrendously day after day after day without remorse?without feeling? in the sickest ways possible? I mean you would have to be either someone with out feeling, someone who enjoyed doing that type of thing, or someone who was mentally retarded to really want to hurt someone to that degree in those ways...I mean to put it into perspective...how many of you could go out and do the exact same thing to someone you didnt know anything about except that they MIGHT be ( for arguments sake) Catholic? i mean seriously would you be able to force someone into a confession using those methods, listening to them scream and beg, watching the life drain out of them like that???

IMO i just couldnt...no matter if it was my worst enemy on this planet i couldnt. :(

"My church is not of silver and gold,
Its glory lies beyond judgement of souls
The commandments are of consolation & warmth
You know our sacred dream won't fail
The sanctury tender and so frail
The sacrament of love
The sacrament of warmth is true
The sacrament is you"
H.I.M

#18 Cairelle

Cairelle

    GiGi Extraordinaire

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,350 posts

Posted 22 December 2007 - 05:49 PM

Thanks for the article, Adalwolfa. Nothing irritates me more than some pentacle-wearing rabbit who spouts off about witches being persecuted and burned by the millions. Idiots, every one.

I HATE the phrase "burning times", UGH.

“People don’t live in New Orleans because it is easy. They live here because they are incapable of living anywhere else in the just same way.” – Ian McNulty, A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina


#19 Ancestral Celt

Ancestral Celt

    Hermit

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,122 posts

Posted 27 December 2007 - 08:12 PM

What is interesting in the so-called "witch" trials in Britain and Ireland is that those accused were not necessarily in trouble for using "witchcraft" but how they used it. For instance, some were charged with murder, treason, attempted murder, theft, fraud. Yes, they were convicted and, yes, they were either accused or admitted to being witches, but witchcraft was not the charge, but the tool and/or cause.

I suppose it was one way of rationalists not having to admit to witchcraft actually existing, if the charge was something different?


#20 Cairelle

Cairelle

    GiGi Extraordinaire

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,350 posts

Posted 28 December 2007 - 04:27 AM

Yes, I believe you're correct.

If I recall correctly, at one point it was considered heresy to even admit that witchcraft existed at all!

“People don’t live in New Orleans because it is easy. They live here because they are incapable of living anywhere else in the just same way.” – Ian McNulty, A Season of Night: New Orleans Life After Katrina