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Atheopagan Wheel of the Year

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Atheopaganism is a newer tradition of paganism, which does not practice deism or theism, but still preserves the spirit of paganism through tradition, earth-centric celebration, nature reverence, folklore, and sometimes ancestral veneration and a form of magical practice. As a self-identified atheopagan, I still celebrate the Wheel of the Year but a bit differently than other traditions. My Wheel of the Year has always been based off of ecological and agricultural changes, celebrating the seasons, and psychological metaphors inspired by nature which I incorporate into my own self-care practices or ancestral veneration practices. Well, little did I know that other atheopagans have made their own official version of the Wheel of the Year! Here is the article: https://atheopaganism.wordpress.com/2015/01/29/an-atheopagan-life-celebrating-riverain-and-adapting-the-wheel-of-the-year/ and here is the takeaway summary:

"Yule (Winter Solstice). The Festival of Lights, keeping us warm through the Longest Night. Celebrates family, community, and beginning of light’s return with the lengthening of days. A time to gather together to survive the cold and dark, to celebrate and give thanks for what sustains us even in the darkest times. It is the height of Winter, and celebrated as the New Year.

Riverain (Midpoint between Winter Solstice and Vernal Equinox). The Festival of Rain. The height of the rainy season in my region, when the mountains are emerald green and creeks are roaring with water. Celebrates rain, water, art, poetry, music. A time for preparation for what is hoped for in the future (such as sharpening gardening tools and kicking off Spring cleaning). The beginning of Spring.

High Spring. (Vernal Equinox) The Festival of the Newly Born. Celebrates renewal, childhood, innocence, playfulness, discovery. A time for planting seeds, sowing the crops and garden. Per the name, the height of Spring.

May Day (midpoint between Vernal Equinox & Summer Solstice). The Festival of Love and Maturity. Celebrates passage into adulthood, sexuality, freedom, fertility. The beginning of Summer.

Midsummer (Summer Solstice). The Festival of Attainment. Celebrates the Longest Day, arrival into comfort, leisure, relaxation and enjoyment. The height of summer.

Summer’s End (midpoint between Summer Solstice and Autumnal Equinox). The Festival of Work. Celebrates technology, science and invention, responsibility, physical work. First of the Harvest Festivals (the Grain Harvest) and the beginning of Autumn.

Harvest (Autumnal Equinox). The High Harvest Festival. Celebrates gratitude for the bounty of the Earth, the harvest of what has been worked for, the gifts of the World, enjoyment of the fruits of labors. Second of the Harvest Festivals (the Harvest of Fruits and Vegetables), height of Autumn. The beginning of transition into the darker time of year.

Hallows (midpoint between Autumnal Equinox & Winter Solstice). The Feast of Darkness and Endings. Celebrates the wisdom of old age, acknowledges the inevitability of Death, the legacy of ancestors, the memory of those no longer alive. A time of the drawing down of nature into the dark and dormant part of the year, to contemplate the unknown, to acknowledge the darkness in life. It is a time for burial/release/composting/grieving what is ended to make room for what is to come, to anticipate the return of the rains, and to enjoy the spooky, gothic and darkly atmospheric. It is the final Harvest festival (the Flesh Harvest) and the beginning of Winter."

 

I also observe some of the Satanic Temple version of holidays, such as their version of Lupercalia (all dogs deserve our love!!!), Hexennacht (which basically overlaps May Day/Beltane), and Sol Invictus (because it's easy).

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I was brought up in Scotland, so the Celtic Folk Lore and the seasonal changes are perfect for me.  Now I live in western Canada, and the seasons are practically the same, except for a different Time Zone calculation.  I just use the same names, no need to invent somethng else.

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That's interesting. Riverain tends to be a snowy time where I live. I think I would prefer rain.

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I prefer Rain to Snow, snow on the tops of the mountains is nice, shovelling it is not!  Riverin is good though or The Big Wet!  At the moment here we are in "The Deep Freeze"

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On 1/22/2021 at 10:42 AM, Onyx said:

I was brought up in Scotland, so the Celtic Folk Lore and the seasonal changes are perfect for me.  Now I live in western Canada, and the seasons are practically the same, except for a different Time Zone calculation.  I just use the same names, no need to invent somethng else.

Do you practice any traditional magic from that area or do you stick with chaos magic? I relish getting to hear about traditional ancestral/cultural magical traditions (even though I only practice my own). 😄 

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I do my own brand of Magick, but I do have an insane Horseshoe collection.  I  always cherish a Horseshoe for Luck.  I have them hanging points up over every door.  I silver leaf sometimes.  It is lucky to present the Bride a Horseshoe for Luck on her wedding day.

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