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#1 Sagefire

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 06:13 PM

I am soon to inherit the family farmstead.  It is a modest 55 acres in western Oregon and is part of what was a thriving dairy in the late 19th- early 20th centuries.

 

I grew upon this farm, we used it as a small goat and poultry farm, though currently it is used only for rented pasture.

 

This land has a natural spring and pond, and at least 20 acres of woods and blackberries.  As a child I ran in these woods and fields burying witch bottles and marking trees with Runes and sigils.   I practiced magick in clearings and secret places throughout.

 

My intention is to turn this into a magickal space in it's entirety.  The fences will be replaced with hedgerows and each corner will be planted with Oak, Ash, Willow, Cedar and Rowan trees with Holly in between.  Natural organic herbs and plants will be grown as well as fruit trees.  I would like it to become a gathering place for witches, musicians and artists and a venue for festivals and similar events as well as a small culinary farm and a safe place for those wishing to practice the craft.

 

Interesting note, My mother's ashes are buried on this land, and it is my father's wish to have his interred here as well.

 

The point of this post is how to magickally protect all of this.  Spells?  Charms?  Ritual?  Any suggestions will be appreciated.  This land must become powerful and warded enough to stretch for generations of my family.

 

 


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#2 Onyx

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Posted 09 August 2019 - 06:41 PM

Sounds like a wonderful place. The hedgerows would make a great natural boundary and also attract all sorts of birds and animals.
You could mark the corners of the property with railroad spikes.
Holly and Rowan are really good protective trees too.

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#3 FancyShadowCat

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 02:37 AM

That sounds like a really big space to protect all by yourself. I’d try fostering some relationships with local spirits.
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#4 Zombee

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Posted 10 August 2019 - 01:10 PM

I think your plans for planting specific trees is protection thru Nature. As you plant, ask each indwelling spirit to share that intent.
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#5 BlackbirdSong

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 03:45 PM

Just a thought, but if you had any dogs on the farm that protected it in some form, were they buried there too? I'd be tempted to ask them for help along with the trees. I agree with the hedgerow being great protection from both a spiritual point of view and a practical one. No one want to climb a blackthorn hedge, and if they make the mistake of doing so they soon realise the error!

 

I'm interested in this thread because I have just moved too. For me, it's nowhere near so much land (UK and not well off by any stretch) it's about 2 acres - which sounds tiny compared to yours! Still, it's been without boundaries for years, so I'm looking out for any new ideas. Yours sounds beautiful and what a lovely plan to have!


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#6 Mona

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Posted 11 August 2019 - 04:24 PM

That sounds like a really big space to protect all by yourself. I’d try fostering some relationships with local spirits.

I support this idea. They can be very good with it. 


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#7 Sagefire

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Posted 12 August 2019 - 05:43 PM

It is a large space and yes, We have 8 family dogs buried on that farm.  I like the ideas of building a relationship with those spirits.  What would be the best way to go about that?

I like the RR spike idea.

I also want to replace all the gates with iron ones.

All that being said, Am I too far off in thinking that these boundaries and protective measures must be maintained?


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#8 Onyx

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 07:35 PM

There is an old Scottish custom of beating the boundaries, I would have to look up the meaning of the custom, but I think it was the old way of keeping the boundaries established.
I will look it up for you and get back later.

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#9 Onyx

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 07:40 PM

So Wikipedia says it is an English and Welsh tradition of walking the Parish boundaries so that the people knew the boundaries and where they lay. Also to protect the boundaries
Also called Beating the Bounds. They did it in Scotland too, Wiki does not know all.

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#10 Sagefire

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 05:52 PM

I have heard of this.  It is also common to ring a bell when doing this.  I like this idea.  I am also considering constructing 'gates' at the cardinal direction points along the boundaries from a point at the very center of the land.  I figure stone and iron would be appropriate for these.  They would serve as portals or watchtowers, and look awesome too.  Imagine walking a hedgerow and seeing a stone and iron gate inscribed with runes deep in the blackthorn and berries.


Edited by Sagefire, 14 August 2019 - 05:55 PM.

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#11 Onyx

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 12:19 AM

I imagine there would have been a great deal of noise and merriment, ringing a bell definatly raises the vibration of the moment.
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#12 Onyx

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 12:25 AM

The Gates would be awesome, almost like 4 watchtowers, portals for sure. So now you must become a blacksmith too.
If I had a large piece of land I would want to construct my own stone circle. Just a little one, a personal use one.

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#13 Sagefire

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 01:49 PM

Oddly enough, I have done blacksmithing.  My great-grandfather's forge still stands on the ancestral farm in Minnesota.  I intend to build an exact copy.  I also intend to use a few of the oak trees on the farm to hand build a Gypsy vardo.  I have actual blueprints from the Reading Coach Co. circa 1865.  Since I intend to wok the land with a Shire horse team, pulling a vardo should be no problem.  My plans are awesome.


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#14 Onyx

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 05:45 PM

So many plans, I like the idea of a Gypsy caravan pulled by a Gypsy Cob, they are lighter than a Shire but have the big hairy feet like a Shire Horse.
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#15 Sagefire

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Posted 22 August 2019 - 08:34 PM

I wanted to originally raise vanners but I can't really feed a herd, and Shires really draw a crowd.  If people see me working the front 10 with a Shire team, It would only be good press for the farm.


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#16 Belwenda

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 03:03 PM

As far as protection;  I used big stones and a couple of boulders (that had to be placed by backhoe) at the corners, as sentries. 


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"For there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so" W.S.

#17 Onyx

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 05:33 PM

I wanted to originally raise vanners but I can't really feed a herd, and Shires really draw a crowd.  If people see me working the front 10 with a Shire team, It would only be good press for the farm.


When I lived in Scotland, my Father worked at a milling company, they imported legumes, peas and beans. Next door to the Factory was the Black and White whiskey distillery, The main attraction of the distillery were the huge Clydesdale horses that pulled the drays filled with the huge whiskey barrels.
They were all turned out with their manes braided and all their shining horse brasses. Every piece of harness polished and their coats groomed to perfection.
A piece of bygone history, and a cherished memory.

Edited by Onyx, 23 August 2019 - 05:38 PM.

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#18 Mona

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 07:19 PM

Oddly enough, I have done blacksmithing.  My great-grandfather's forge still stands on the ancestral farm in Minnesota.  I intend to build an exact copy.  I also intend to use a few of the oak trees on the farm to hand build a Gypsy vardo.  I have actual blueprints from the Reading Coach Co. circa 1865.  Since I intend to wok the land with a Shire horse team, pulling a vardo should be no problem.  My plans are awesome.

Yes, awesome!


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#19 Sagefire

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 07:46 PM

As far as protection;  I used big stones and a couple of boulders (that had to be placed by backhoe) at the corners, as sentries. 

 

This is a good idea.  Imagine using the horses to maneuver these rocks into place.  As the hedgerows grow, a small hidden path could be made to each stone.  What a wonderful place to work spells and leave offerings.

 

I love seeing the big cold bloods in fine livery.  It is also widely known that a horse team will quickly bond to and become part of the spirit of the land they live and work on.


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#20 Mona

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Posted 24 August 2019 - 04:35 PM

Yes, true about horses.


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