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Propogating catnip - please share your experiences

Catnip Witches garden Herbal remedies Catnip and cats

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#1 Stella

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 06:46 PM

So, I garden, but I've never grown catnip. I'd like to start growing it in my yard, but i have concerns about cats loving it to death. Do you start yours from seed or nusery plants? How do you dealt with the cats? Thanks.
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#2 Onyx

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 08:45 PM

The secret to growing Catnip is a hanging basket. I start it in the Spring from seed, it is spindly the first year and really grows well in the second year.
I harvest before it flowers, I dry it in a mesh bag that I hang from the curtain rod in the kitchen. You can get about three cuttings of nip in a season. The cat loves it fresh or dried.
You could buy a plant from the nursery, it would save a lot of time. I keep the whole planter in a kitchen window in the winter. So I have old plants and new ones in at the same time.

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#3 Stella

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 09:54 PM

Thank you Onyx :) a hanging basket sounds do- able and has offered a solution to something that has been puzzling me. We've 4 cats and I've one godcat (I'm to adopt my BFF's cat if/when she dies). My favorite (a grey and white fluffy ball of love and irrascable shinnagins) is crazy for the stuff. :D. He might even try clumbing or jumping onto it, but if I hang it from the rafter outside the kitchen window (where hes likely to be seen and subsequently chased off) it just might work. Thanks!
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#4 Onyx

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 11:04 PM

I hang my Nip basket with others containing flowers, on my front porch. The railing is narrow, so the cats can't jump up. They know if I'm there I will share, and nobody goes without.
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#5 Aurelian

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 02:33 AM

I really can't imagine anything easier to grow, and I am not a skilled gardener.  When I lived in my old house in the city, it grew between my house and the next, with very little sun exposure, as the area was shaded by huge evergreen trees.  It required literally nothing at all, and self-propagated.  I'd just go out and pick some from time to time, dry it, and use it as a mild sedative tea when needed, and of course the kitty got her fair share.  The area had some outdoor cats as well, and it did just fine, nonetheless!


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#6 Onyx

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Posted 22 January 2019 - 07:01 PM

You must have some well behaved cats in your area Aurelian! When I planted a very nice big Catnip plant directly into the garden, the cats took turns sitting on it, eating it and rolling on it. until it was dust.
Now they have to ask me nicely first. I am the Nip Master!

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#7 Mountain Witch

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 01:58 PM

Catnip starts easily from seed and will tolerate virtually any soil or sun, but like all members of the mint family, it grows best in partial sun. Harvesting it before it flowers ensures all the "good stuff" is still in the leaves, but I always let a few plants flower & go to seed - it'll self-propagate. Catnip is a perennial and although the stalks die back during our winter, there's usually a volunteer or two down by the soil that will grow, too. Eventually, though, the plant will die, which is why I always let a few go to seed.

 

I have an entire bed of it but our cats are indoor-only (and the neighbor's outside cat hasn't seemed to have found the bed). When I tried growing it in the city, the neighborhood cats loved the plants to death. Literally. The hanging basket is a good idea.


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#8 Onyx

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Posted 26 January 2019 - 08:14 PM

Catnip starts easily from seed and will tolerate virtually any soil or sun, but like all members of the mint family, it grows best in partial sun. Harvesting it before it flowers ensures all the "good stuff" is still in the leaves, but I always let a few plants flower & go to seed - it'll self-propagate. Catnip is a perennial and although the stalks die back during our winter, there's usually a volunteer or two down by the soil that will grow, too. Eventually, though, the plant will die, which is why I always let a few go to seed.


Thanks Mountain Witch, good info. about leaving some flower to seed, I usually buy a pack of new seeds to add to the hanging basket.

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#9 Onyx

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Posted 28 January 2019 - 08:59 PM

Yesterday I bought my first 6 paks of new seeds, including Catnip seeds. Seeds are like hope in a package, you plant them and you hope they will grow.
I also got Black Hollyhocks, Sweet peas, Beetroots, Marigolds and Sunflowers.

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#10 PapaGheny

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 06:58 PM

Most of my catnip needs are medicinal and for that I'm with Onyx with the hanging baskets. Like Mountain Witch and Aurelian said I've found it an easy starter from seed and in a spot it likes healthy plants and propagation has taken care of it's self when some gets to go to seed.

 

I don't mind cats but I also don't intentionally keep them, and for the most part neither do the neighbors. The cats we encounter here are abandoned or more often several generation feral. This has lead me to planting catnip and cat grass as a deterrent. I keep some near the barn, the corn, and other places I'd like to keep down the rodent or bird population. I tend to take the approach of planting enough to share with the wild life and it seems to have been effective. It holds back infestation and pushes the often greedy rats to more sustainable food like the wild buckwheat.

Attracting them away from where I don't want them also helps. It keeps the cats fed on rodents and snakes instead of chicken and pheasant. As well as keeping them away from plants and such I don't want them to get into. Besides its kind of enjoyable to watch them run about and talk to them while I'm over there working.

 

Anyway don't know if any of that will be helpful to anyone, I just thought I'd throw my two cents out there and say hello to you folks.


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#11 Onyx

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 09:02 PM

I don't mind cats but I also don't intentionally keep them, and for the most part neither do the neighbors. The cats we encounter here are abandoned or more often several generation feral. This has lead me to planting catnip and cat grass as a deterrent. I keep some near the barn, the corn, and other places I'd like to keep down the rodent or bird population. It holds back infestation and pushes the often greedy rats to more sustainable food like the wild buckwheat.



Good idea! Feral cats need a job too, encouraging them to stay around and eat your rodents, while rewarding them with Catnip is brilliant!

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#12 PapaGheny

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Posted 17 March 2019 - 04:16 PM

Thank you for saying so Onyx. Everyone seem pretty happy with the arrangement so far.

 

So, I'm a bit curious. Does anyone know how does catnip do from clippings or root division? I would figure it to be like most mints. Where if you happen to hit it with a weed-whacker or shovel most often just ends up spreading it in the end. Just asking because I've never tried it myself.


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#13 Onyx

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 09:39 PM

I'm going to try to propagate a cutting in a glass of water, see if it will root. I'll let you know what happens.
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#14 PapaGheny

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 01:06 PM

Well thank you Onyx. I would appreciate hearing about your findings. At first this was a passing curiosity, but now I've started thinking about it. It seems it may be quite convenient for spreading or a second planting.


Edited by PapaGheny, 21 March 2019 - 01:07 PM.

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#15 Onyx

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 07:43 PM

Today I actually put the catnip in a glass of water, we will see what happens.
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#16 Onyx

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Posted 02 April 2019 - 02:07 PM

My Catnip experiment is going well. I have roots growing on my Catnip cutting, just a few but I will leave the cutting in water until there are more roots and then transplant it into a pot.
Then we will see if we can get a viable plant. My hanging planter of nip is flourishing, I gave it some fertilizer. Too cold to put it outside still. My cat is a lucky boy!

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#17 PapaGheny

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Posted 02 April 2019 - 02:30 PM

That's sound like its going pretty good then.

 

I started some from seed in the window just showing themselves now. It looks like a good bunch, but the two cells closest to the window seem to be to chilly to germinate yet.

 

 

edited to make this readable after posting in a hurry.


Edited by PapaGheny, 04 April 2019 - 10:29 AM.

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#18 Onyx

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Posted 08 April 2019 - 05:46 PM

I have a new seed pack of Catnip that i"m going to start soon in a new pot. In fact I have to find where I put all my new seeds. I bought a whole lots of new bulbs too. Lilies etc. love them.
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#19 woodwitchofthewest

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Posted 08 October 2019 - 03:46 PM

If you manage to get a patch going outside (maybe put a cage over it so the cats don't destroy it) and you let it go to seed - you will probably find you have enough from that point on to open your own catnip emporium.  

 

That's my experience.  lol


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If I were more clever, something interesting would appear here...


#20 Onyx

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 10:57 PM

I did leave some flowers to bloom and go to seed, I have saved some of the seeds for next year, they are tiny! I have quite a lot of different seeds saved from the garden this year.
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