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From Chaos to Tradition

Traditional chaos magic path

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#1 LiberArts

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 03:32 AM

Hello, TW. I'm still fairly new here and I've opened this new thread seeking a bit of advice. Advice on transition. For years I've been a "Chaotic Hermeticist" I'm trying to transition to a traditional path of witchcraft. at the moment I'm having trouble deciding between some reading material. I think i've read enough blogs, I want something structured. below are a list of books and my thoughts on what i've researched on them. please give me your input. 

 

Cunning-Folk and Familiar Spirits: - ByEmma Wilby

Witching Way of the Hollow Hill: - ByRobin Artisson

The Horn of Evenwood: By - Robin Artisson

Craft of the Untamed: An Inspired Vision of Traditional Witchcraft: ByNicholaj De Mattos Frisvold

An Cawdarn Rudh: A Companion of Invocations and Charms for An Carow Gwyn: - Robin Artisson

Letters from the Devil's Forest: - ByRobin Artisson

The Resurrection of the Meadow: - Robin Artisson

A Deed Without a Name: Unearthing the Legacy of Traditional Witchcraft: - By Lee Morgan 

The Call of the Horned Piper: - By Nigel Jackson


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#2 Duchess

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 04:46 AM

That is a lot of Robin Artisson. 


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#3 LiberArts

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 04:56 AM

His work seems appealing, but I don't know if it holds true.
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#4 FrozenThunderbolt

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 06:45 AM

"Treading the mill" might be a good addition as a fair number of people refer to at least parts of it.

+ Something by Daniel A. Schulke, while some people find him overly poetic I enjoy his writing a good deal.


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"Jack of all trades, master of none, though oftentimes better than master of one." You may call me Jed.  

#5 Zombee

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 02:07 PM

My iPad doesn't pick up your choice of text color ... I don't see any book list so can't comment.
Ive read 2 earlier books by Robyn Artiisson & my perception is that he's tested his own practices & they work for him, which is all any author can say. The few examples of his earlier writings that I've tried and adapted for myself have been useful. You don't know until you try for yourself. I nit-pick his methods. He's good at stage setting which is half the task to getting results, IMO.

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#6 LiberArts

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 02:25 PM

Heres a repost of the list. Thanks for the input! :)

 

 

Cunning-Folk and Familiar Spirits: - ByEmma Wilby

Witching Way of the Hollow Hill: - ByRobin Artisson

The Horn of Evenwood: By - Robin Artisson

Craft of the Untamed: An Inspired Vision of Traditional Witchcraft: ByNicholaj De Mattos Frisvold

An Cawdarn Rudh: A Companion of Invocations and Charms for An Carow Gwyn: - Robin Artisson

Letters from the Devil's Forest: - ByRobin Artisson

The Resurrection of the Meadow: - Robin Artisson

A Deed Without a Name: Unearthing the Legacy of Traditional Witchcraft: - By Lee Morgan 

The Call of the Horned Piper: - By Nigel Jackson


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#7 FancyShadowCat

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 06:03 AM

I second what Zombee said about Robin Artisson putting emphasis on setting the stage. Personally I like most of Artissons style of casting, but there are also parts which do not resonate with me. Such as his belief that devotion to a horned god he refers to as The Master is necessary for your spells to work. He also states that the caster is purely a conduit of power rather than a source, so an outside source is necessary (like a familiar or The Master). I personally don’t believe either of these things but I have no problem tossing those bits aside and taking in what I personally agree with.

A popular book with members of this site is “A Cornish Book of Ways” by Gemma Gary if you want to look up a review in the search bar. I think all of the reviews are positive.

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#8 LiberArts

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 05:54 PM

Thanks ShadowCat! I've been looking a lot at Ms Gary! I was just a bit worried he style maybe region locked. But the more I think about it the more foolish that seems to me. 


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#9 FancyShadowCat

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 04:30 AM

Thanks ShadowCat! I've been looking a lot at Ms Gary! I was just a bit worried he style maybe region locked. But the more I think about it the more foolish that seems to me.


Of course 😊 I’m probably as new to this or newer than you are and have wondered the same thing. From what I’ve picked up here, regionally restricted aspects of a practice are likely (to my understanding) centered around local spirits. Since for instance, entities in England may be significantly different from entities you’ll find in say the Mojave Desert of California. So I am keeping that in mind when I read about practices with nature spirits and such in case that treating them the same way might be inappropriate. (Though I haven’t decided to try and form relationships with anything besides plants so far)

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#10 LiberArts

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 04:50 AM

Yes I agree, the approach I figured is what's mostly different.
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#11 BlackbirdSong

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 12:26 PM

Seconding Treading the Mill and a book by Schulke. I enjoyed Apocalyptic Witchcraft by Peter Grey, but I know others haven't liked it so much. It's not so much a how-to book but gives a very descriptive flavour of one strain of Traditional Witchcraft (though if you didn't like his essay, 'Rewilding Witchcraft' then it won't be for you). I don't agree with everything he says or describes, but I found it a useful read regardless. I also really liked Peter Paddon, and his book A grimoire for modern cunningfolk is more instructional. I enjoyed some of the exercises and the information was clear. You also hear his voice come through in his writing, and it's less formal than Schulke, Grey and Artisson too. If Schulke's style is more preferred, then The Dragon Book of Essex by Chumbley is very structured but again Cultus Sabbati rather than Paddon's more folky witchcraft.

For after the basic structure is in place for you, some of my favourite books for Traditional Witchcraft haven't really been witchcraft books, The Crone's Book of Magical Words is poetry but gave me some ideas, and more herbals (Out of the Earth by Simon Mills - good for science) and folklore. I've found lots of inspiration in folklore that inspired my practice and helped me go deeper into trusting myself, and so many threads that interconnect and weave together that suddenly bring sense to something that hadn't clicked in my brain yet.


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#12 LiberArts

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Posted 27 October 2018 - 09:01 PM

Seconding Treading the Mill and a book by Schulke. I enjoyed Apocalyptic Witchcraft by Peter Grey, but I know others haven't liked it so much. It's not so much a how-to book but gives a very descriptive flavour of one strain of Traditional Witchcraft (though if you didn't like his essay, 'Rewilding Witchcraft' then it won't be for you). I don't agree with everything he says or describes, but I found it a useful read regardless. I also really liked Peter Paddon, and his book A grimoire for modern cunningfolk is more instructional. I enjoyed some of the exercises and the information was clear. You also hear his voice come through in his writing, and it's less formal than Schulke, Grey and Artisson too. If Schulke's style is more preferred, then The Dragon Book of Essex by Chumbley is very structured but again Cultus Sabbati rather than Paddon's more folky witchcraft.

For after the basic structure is in place for you, some of my favourite books for Traditional Witchcraft haven't really been witchcraft books, The Crone's Book of Magical Words is poetry but gave me some ideas, and more herbals (Out of the Earth by Simon Mills - good for science) and folklore. I've found lots of inspiration in folklore that inspired my practice and helped me go deeper into trusting myself, and so many threads that interconnect and weave together that suddenly bring sense to something that hadn't clicked in my brain yet.

 

 

I really enjoy work from Peter Grey, I have many works from Scarlet Imprint. I recently finished reading "The Red Goddess" which I very much enjoyed pulled some useful arte from that work. Before that I did read "Apocalyptic Witchcraft" I liked the text but I found it to be more of a contextual work in modernity of how workers of the craft should move forward. It is one of the Text the inspired me to join the community. I also enjoyed "Lucifer: Princeps" though I found it to be half baked, I am aware Mr Grey is working on the sequel "Lucifer: Praxis" but I feel its been a long time coming. That work is based on his style of Luciferian Witchcraft. I can say it is much needed when "Michael Ford" is somehow leading the torch in that tradition. 

 

I recently ordered some new material and should be receiving it tomorrow. "The Horn of Evenwood", "Letters from the Devils forest" by "Robin Artisson" and "Six Ways: Approaches & Entries for Practical Magic" by "Aidan Wachter" (Worth looking into him) I decided to go with Artisson because I resonate with his writing style. I was able to find a digital copy of "The Horn of Evenwood" After reading the first 40 pages or so I wanted a physical copy. I have a pull towards it and I feel it will work with me. 


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#13 FancyShadowCat

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 03:39 AM

I liked the rituals and most of the “pillars of sorcery” section of The Horn of Evenwood. I read some amazon reviews of the Approaches and Entries for Practical Magic which said the material was somewhat obvious and nothing profound/nothing you wouldn’t find in other writings, so I’m curious to know your opinion once you’ve had the chance to read it.

Edited by FancyShadowCat, 28 October 2018 - 03:40 AM.

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#14 LiberArts

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 05:49 AM

Sure i'll let you know what I think. I figured it wasn't anything special. What I saw really looking for was a system to follow and adept. My background is hermeticism and chaos magic so the ritual and folk style is foreign to me.  


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