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Thai Ghost "Herding" Ceremony


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#1 Khundekling

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 04:15 PM

I came across this news article the other day...

 

http://www.khaosoden...thern-thailand/

 

It talks about a week long ceremony, that is held every 30 years, where a group of necromancers call out those that were killed in road collisions etc. and put them to rest.

 

Can you Imagine a practice like this happening in the west!!


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#2 Phaedra

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Posted 10 May 2018 - 04:19 PM

What a great gesture of comfort and remembrance. We'd probably be better off; if for absolutely nothing else, a nation which makes it a point to carry out such a considerate rite on behalf of the communal dead is probably a more considerate and respectful nation over all, generally speaking. 


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#3 Oroboros

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Posted 12 May 2018 - 05:13 PM

That’s certainly interesting. I am deeply bothered by how our society handles death in general- or more to the point, tries like hell not to handle it, and when we do it’s with gloves, tongs, and a general belief that if we ignore it it will go away. So the idea that the dead of strangers are given this kind of consideration seems very healthy and respectful. That being said, some spirits are still here because it’s exactly where they want to be:).
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#4 Phaedra

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Posted 01 June 2018 - 03:33 PM

I've been thinking about this again, recently. Again in my life, I've experienced this irreverence for the dead so prevalent in the west. Last week, my remaining grandfather passed away. It was sudden, and it was unexpected. Three days later, a funeral was held in his hometown, and it was a quiet affair that took up less than an entire morning. I honor him, and open my ancestral space to his spirit, but it seems quiet there. Vacant. I'm not sure yet of what my beliefs are regarding the afterlife and the role of human spirits in the Other or Underworld. I found this article of another culture's traditions involving the beloved dead several months ago, and it came to mind as I watched my own family's hasty packing-up and putting away of the life of one of our own. I'll add as a warning that the link below does contain the photo of a corpse. It is admittedly a very macabre practice, but it seems to give these people a healthy transitioning period from the life that they had with that person there, and into the life they now live with that person absent.

 

https://www.independ...l-a7694541.html


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#5 Solanaceae

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Posted 01 June 2018 - 05:37 PM

Phaedra, some think that in the west,thanks mostly to the church and government, they have tried to limit our ability to connect with our dead.
Yet another source of power made difficult to access.
Lucky for us, there are other ways. Blood calls blood and they will find you.
The new dead don't often come around right away, other then perhaps to say goodbye or check up on the living.
Sometimes they have things to do in the other fist. They need to get oriented and learn how to interact first. They usually have some baggage to work through.It is best to let them do that unless they express they need or want your help.
My own dad for instance was always so independent and self sufficient. He wanted time, so I gave him that. Three years later on his birthday he showed up.
Some need more time then others.

Edited by Solanaceae, 01 June 2018 - 05:42 PM.

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#6 Phaedra

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Posted 02 June 2018 - 03:01 PM

Yeah... I'll stay optimistic and just let be what will be. I do know I also need to better cultivate my sense for it, and I've been keeping my hands on that for a bit, trying to make it ingrained routine. I think I unconsciously "other" the dead by focusing overmuch on the physical ancestral spaces I have set aside for them, and it builds a sense of distance in my headspace. Probably a bit of cultural influence at play there, too, throwing obstacles in the path between them and my awareness of them. Thich Nhat Hanh did a talk once about honoring and enjoying a relationship with the beloved dead by speaking directly with the spirit of them found within the shared blood on a daily basis. I think he went into it for over an hour, talking about how the blood ensures closeness beyond bodily death and practical ways to strengthen the awareness, which is interesting to me because the existence of a soul is not a part of his beliefs.
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#7 Onyx

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Posted 04 June 2018 - 08:34 PM

I agree that death in the western world has been sanitized for us by the funeral homes.  We no longer wash and dress and layout the dead for the viewing of the body.  It is all done for us.  We hold our funerals in a mortuary instead of in our homes, we are removed from the process.  I think it has made us more fearful of death and it is not a normal process anymore.

I have heard that people put out the roadside memorials to tell the dead that they are infact deceased, so they can move on to the other side and don't linger on.


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