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Cultural Appropriation & Geographical Significance


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#21 Madame

Madame

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Posted 23 December 2016 - 08:56 PM

That's a good point about listening to the land around you and the possibility that what you come up with might mirror Native practices. I have a similar view with my craft - none of my ancestors are native to the area I'm living in, but that doesn't mean the gods their ancient ancestors knew came with them. The land here knows how it wants to be honored, what it wants to work with, and how it can be and wants to be used. That, I feel, is the fundamental starting point of any practice. However, Native cultures developed their traditions to suit their cultural needs, and those traditions grew with the culture. You are starting at the same point they did all those many, many years ago, but you are in a different culture, and have different needs than they did back then. The land is giving you the tools you need, and I think its up to us muggleborns to decide how best to use them in the society we live in now.

 

 

Indeed...stopping and listening is so valuable. To me part of the practice is setting aside what you know to learn. Copying another culture wholesale removes most of the point of the practice as well as the context, I think, in addition to being direspectful. Even when reading the lore of my ancestors, obviously there's an enormous amount of context removed, I can't just jump into some reconstructed version and apply it to a different continent without harboring some skepticism and a feeling of foolishness. I mean no disrespect to people who find joy and purpose in reconstructive paganism but I tried it out and it wasn't something I can say I truly felt. 


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