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Topical Infection stories, remedies, or advice

infections infection Topical infection

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#41 Kallisto

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 08:06 PM

I have quite a few piercings. Admittedly, I have neglected a few (not cleaned them as much as I should have) or played with them too much (I'm skin/scab picker..it's an anxiety disorder I've had all my life and I end up doing it without realizing it). When my piercings get angry or inflamed with a possible mild infection, I've found that following a saline soak/rinse, putting a dab of lavender/tea tree oil (diluted in a carrier oil) directly on the piercing really helps. Both oils are known for their antibacterial properties, promoting healing, and soothing/pain relief. It works quite well! I'd imagine it would also help with mild infections in cuts & scrapes.


Edited by Kallisto, 05 November 2016 - 08:06 PM.

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#42 Wyrd

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 06:20 PM

Thank you for sharing your recipes Wyrd. Particularly the plantain ointment. I have been planing out a new ointment for insect bites and stings I want to have ready by next summer. Buckhorn and basil are the main contributors. Taking the methods you used with the plantain into account may be a great help.

 

By the way I've been running in to the dried vs. fresh issue with plantain used for drawing as well. For storage I have found freezing it spread out on a plate keeps the better part of the potency.

 

 

Hi PapaGheny,

 

I wish that they were mine, alas they are part of my collection from various trusted herbalists.

 

:)


Edited by Wyrd, 07 November 2016 - 06:21 PM.

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#43 PapaGheny

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 02:10 AM

Wyrd, Thank you all the same for unearthing it bring it to light. It dose look like it may be quite helpful.

 

Caps mentioned alcohol. I've been suggesting a foot soak for damaged feet. Mostly for cracked feet, but I seldom find damaged feet with out slight infection or some athlete's foot. The soak was mostly white onion, plantain, and green tea. Over the past two years or so I started adding strong(19.69% ABV) dry wine made from pumpkin and a little apple. The alcohol level should be too diluted for any real antiseptic use. It did add a marked improvement to the effect. It may be aiding in absorption(my thoughts when adding it), or possible a factor of the fermented pumpkin I'm not seeing yet. Other wine also seems to improve the soak, but less effectively. Even with higher ABV.

I was wondering if any one else was using anything along these lines or had any thoughts.

 

I was also halfway thinking of running some off to vinegar to see how it dose in place of apple cider vinegar for some uses, if anyone has thoughts or suggestions there.


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#44 IslandBruja

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 09:08 AM

P.G. - I've urged family members to soak their athletes' foot afflicted feet in hydrogen peroxide nightly to great effect. It works as long as they're diligent and eradicate the fungus before stopping the treatment. Once the skin is new and no longer peeling I have them put extra virgin coconut oil on their (clean) feet at night (again, it's a great anti-fungal).

That said, I don't have anything to contribute for an actual foot wound/infection, but maybe this will spark some ideas for you?

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#45 Aurelian

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 09:30 AM

Pumpkin contains enzymes and nutrients that are really wonderful for skin.  I have no idea about fermented pumpkin, however.  Alcohol and other solvents do greatly enhance skin permeability, though.


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#46 PapaGheny

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 11:33 PM

Island Bruja – I remember years back folk using hydrogen peroxide for foot fungus. It was affective if kept up, just as you said. That's a good one to keep in mind.

 

Aurelian – I think that's where I'm at. It definitely appears more than just the alcohol. Looks like time to hit the book and setup some experiments, to try to work it out.


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#47 Broomflower

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 12:58 AM

My youngest is tube-fed (she was a micro-preemie, almost 5 years old now and still not eating) and she has what is known as a Mic-key, which is essentially a functional body piercing that allows a feeding tube extension to be clicked in so her special prescription formula/medications can go straight into her stomach.  Recently she was ill, seeming to have conjunctivitis.  Well, that infection quickly spread to her Mic-key site.  It was very sensitive and oozy, and she struggle to keep me from touching it which made it hard to feed her.  Her father made an appointment with her pediatric GI, but until she could get to the doctor, I used lavender oil.  (I told her it was "Princess Flower Oil".) It helped keep the infection from getting worse, as well as calming her enough that I could feed her.

 

I've used both heal-all and plantain in salves and poultices.  If you are wildcrafting, just check the leaves and blossoms to be sure you have a positive identification.  Purple dead nettle (Lamium purpureum) is easily mistaken for heal-all (Prunella vulgaris).  It's not harmful, in fact has its own, similar, beneficial properties.  (It's great for stopping bleeding.) It's just not heal-all.  If the leaves are kind of heart-shaped with a velvet-purple tinge towards the stem, you have dead nettle (called "dead" nettle because its leaves resemble a nettle's and it doesn't sting.)  The flowers are a little different, too, heal-all flowering in more of a spike but these plants are still mistaken for each other all the time.  (I've done it!) 

 

Another wild healer that is often mistaken for the other two is ground ivy, or cat's paw (Glechoma hederacea) which is good for cuts but even better for bruises.  It has similar tiny purple flowers, but creeps along the ground or up fenceposts and so on (not a true ivy!) and has characteristic round, scalloped leaves reminiscent of a cat's paw.  Any or all of these three purple-flowered healers can be made into a wonderful, effective salve, plaster or poultice with either or both of the plantains (Plantago major or P. lanceolata) for the treatment of wounds.


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