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Topical Infection stories, remedies, or advice

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#21 westofthemoon

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Posted 05 June 2016 - 03:51 PM

Oroboros, I put it on open wounds, stitches, my face, & sometimes - if I can get them to stay still - on my kids. I use raw honey generally, but just a tiny bit smeared across. I tend to use yarrow oil more though.
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#22 Oroboros

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Posted 05 June 2016 - 05:10 PM

Cool thank you. You know until I had read it was antibacterial I would have assumed it would be terrible, because sugar causes bacteria to proliferate and I associate honey and sugar. I wonder how different they are chemically.
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#23 PapaGheny

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Posted 05 June 2016 - 06:41 PM

On the topic of closing wounds, I cut my arm working the other day. It wasn't too deep but it was long and an awkward angle that made it a bleeder that didn't want to stop. It was making a mess of my work and I thought I was gonna loose daylight walking back to bandage it. Then the wind told me there was purple dead-nettle(Lamium Purpureum) not far off. Or the breeze changed so I could smell it, I figure that's subjective really, but I thanked her regardless. So I bruised the leaves and held them on it and in a few moments the bleeding stopped. It worked great, stayed closed, and healed fast. I had eaten this plant in the past, but I only ever read about using it this way. It will be well remembered for later use.

 

In response to Aefre's comments. As I understand it each publication of Culpeper's had name and display changes in them. But, I found this site last night that is trying to remedy that. http://medherb.com/culpeper_names.html

I printed out the list to stick with my copy. It looks like it could be right handy.


Edited by PapaGheny, 05 June 2016 - 06:43 PM.

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#24 IslandBruja

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 10:08 AM

Great thread.

Belle - I can't tolerate the smell of tea tree oil either but there are SO many different beneficial essential oils you shouldn't just write them all off...

Lavender oil is a fantastic anti-bacterial and is great for healing burns and preventing infection and scarring.

Yes, Honey (raw, unheated = vital) is a wonderful anti-bacterial and anti-fungal full of healing enzymes.

Extra Virgin Coconut oil is as well! (great anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, etc, both inside and outside the body) Might sound weird but they both are really miracle substances.

Unless you live in the tropics like I do this next one might not do you much good (it has to be picked fresh, not the processed products shipped to the mainland which are bereft of their potent properties) but NONI fruit is another true wonder. If you read about it you'll want to plant your own tree - all parts of it are beneficial in one way or another (in fact, I should start a thread about it when I have time).

Anyway, I definitely use garlic (see my comments in the Garlic for Females thread :D ) and apple cider vinegar in many different situations as well.

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#25 Caps

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Posted 04 October 2016 - 05:43 PM

Back home in Appalachia I would usually keep a store of what we called "all-heal" (Prunella vulgaris) that works to close wounds as a poultice with astringent properties.  It grows practically everywhere but I noticed it seems to prefer the mossy areas near pine trees.  Usually it will combine nicely with stinging nettle.

 

The ultimate DIY antiseptic/astringent is also easy to make at home, of course I'm talking about ethanol and its fabrication is a topic for another day.

 

Dog saliva, your own urine, and a multitude of other things people never consider have astringent properties as well.

 

Since I've moved to Alaska I'm finding other plants I can use, yarrow is quite abundant...although I use it mostly to keep bug bites squelched.


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#26 PapaGheny

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 12:50 AM

Well Caps, I can back you up on the all-heal. I'm figuring I learned that one in your parts, because up this far north folk try to correct me to “self-heal” all the time. Any more I don't use it a whole lot topically. It always works great, its just that it has so many other wonderful uses. I tend keep my store for those and go to one of the other abundant topicals. That said I'm strait to it if a soars throat shows risk of infection.

 

And I can say that more than once as a kid a dog has taken care of cuts and scraps and they stayed infection free. Although I'd say there is a lot of factors in that one I think keeps it from being a goto.

 

I figure I've been under using yarrow. This summer it was most of my study and experimentation with herbs. I have been quite happy with it, particularly for wound closing.

 

IslandBruja, I did read your post on garlic. I'm not sure we will ever be inventive enough to run out of uses for garlic. Your post reminded me of absorbing strong herbs for targeting local effects. Like garlic in your shoe for a deep infection in the leg.

 

You also mentioned apple cider vinegar. I wonder if anyone here has read any of D. C. Jarvis M.D.'s books. I found him to be a bit of an one trick pony when it comes to oxymels, but he dose a very good job of outlining his research and showing a range of possible uses.


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#27 westofthemoon

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Posted 14 October 2016 - 04:25 PM

Oh I did reply. Oops

Edited by westofthemoon, 14 October 2016 - 06:39 PM.

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#28 CailinRua

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 01:42 AM

Yarrow is one of my go-to's as well. Its prolific where I live, so its really convenient, and it works. I also happen to love how it smells. I've used it as a compress with comfrey and I've infused it with oils and made balms from that for cuts/scrapes. Its helpful in tea also, has a very medicinal taste though.  ACV is good for everything so I spring for the good stuff (braggs) and typically dilute it if its not going into food or something else.. I've only ever used garlic topically once and havent since, only because the smell seeps in and stays strong, ahahha. I like garlic a lot but not smelling like it. I eat it when im sick and it speeds up the healing process, but i will smell like it still. Powerful stuff haha.

 

For you that are using honey, where do you source your honey? I have a really hard time finding any that isnt clover honey or processed in some way.


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#29 IslandBruja

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 02:16 AM

For you that are using honey, where do you source your honey? I have a really hard time finding any that isnt clover honey or processed in some way.

Do you have any health food stores in your area? They will typically carry various types of honey that are raw and hopefully local as well... Can't tell from your profile where you're located so can't make any specific recommendations otherwise, but I noticed you liked my beeswax candle post and they actually sell honey too in their "accessories" section, so if you're planning on ordering sugar skull candles you can try some:
https://www.bigdippe...22&ParentCat=34

Edited by IslandBruja, 17 October 2016 - 02:51 AM.

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#30 CailinRua

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 02:49 AM

Awesome, thanks. I have that store open in a tab for my next impulse purchase, haha. I rarely go into health food stores, but it makes sense they would have it there. Last time I went in was ages ago to buy a "specialty" item i didnt want to order online and have shipped. Now that I'm thinking of it, Im sure one store near me has bees and should have raw honey. I used to use a lot of honey in tea and havent for a long time now just because my taste buds prefer less sweetness these days (thank gods for that too). Never bothered with the raw vs processed or clover vs bee, but it didnt matter for my purposes.


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#31 Aurelian

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Posted 22 October 2016 - 08:48 PM

Dunno if anyone has posted this.  Vetiver oil is antibacterial, antifungal, and mildly anti-inflammatory.  It's good stuff and also helps to prevent scarring.  Highly recommended.


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"The truth about the world, he said, is that anything is possible. Had you not seen it from birth and thereby bled it of its strangeness it would appear to you for what it is, a hat trick in a medicine show, a fevered dream, a trance bepopulate with chimeras having neither analogue nor precedent, an itinerant carnival, a migratory tentshow whose ultimate destination after many a pitch in many a mudded field is unspeakable and calamitous beyond reckoning." - Cormac McCarthy

#32 Christine

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 11:40 AM

I just saw the honey question now... Calin Rua, have you looked into whether there is a local apiarist guild? Small scale beekeepers produce honey that has an extra sort of oomph, and there seems to be something special about getting it from near your home. I don't know, maybe it's worth checking whether your local guild has a website?


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#33 PapaGheny

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 07:15 PM

Another good place to find beekeepers is a farmers market. If none of them sell there someone may know where to find them. That's where I get my good honey then I keep a jar of passable but cheep stuff for day to day use. That said I definitely agree that local honey has yielded the best results for me.

 

On the essential oils front. I've only been studying and experimenting with a couple of years now. The more I learn the less I find them a good substation for other methods. As it stands I have only found them remarkable for mood altering aromatherapy. I have found some affective for pain management and rash. However, not effective enough to replace salutations that are cheaper, easier to get, easier to work with, and comparable in effect. Not only that but there is an absurd amount of misinformation about them in mass media and in published works. So, my question is. Dose anyone know any good works on the topic to for someone putting together a useful course of study?

 

I would greatly appreciate it. I can't help but think that this could be a useful tool if properly understood.


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#34 Mountain Witch

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 08:24 PM

Papa, my go-to essential oil author is Valerie Worwood. There's another good one, too, but I'm not in the office (where my reference books are) to look. Will look tomorrow.


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#35 PapaGheny

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 11:25 PM

Thank you very much Mountain Witch. I will get right on hunting down her work.


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#36 Oroboros

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 11:09 AM

Dunno if anyone has posted this.  Vetiver oil is antibacterial, antifungal, and mildly anti-inflammatory.  It's good stuff and also helps to prevent scarring.  Highly recommended.

 

Not very familiar with this- so excuse stupid question.  Do you use a vetiver essential oil or is it a different form?


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...From ev’ry depth of good and ill , The mystery which binds me still...— Poe

#37 Aurelian

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 09:38 AM

Yes, the essential oil.  The documentation of it's properties are extensively researched.


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"The truth about the world, he said, is that anything is possible. Had you not seen it from birth and thereby bled it of its strangeness it would appear to you for what it is, a hat trick in a medicine show, a fevered dream, a trance bepopulate with chimeras having neither analogue nor precedent, an itinerant carnival, a migratory tentshow whose ultimate destination after many a pitch in many a mudded field is unspeakable and calamitous beyond reckoning." - Cormac McCarthy

#38 Oroboros

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 05:45 AM

Thanks sounds like a great staple to have in one's arsenal.;)
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...From ev’ry depth of good and ill , The mystery which binds me still...— Poe

#39 Wyrd

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 01:46 PM

Essential oils are always my go-to for first aid, Lavender and Lemongrass oils are a must have in my first aid kit for any kind of infection.

 

A true cure-all, lavender essential oil is antibacterial, antiviral and antiinflammatory
properties which soothe skin rashes and many other skin infections. Furthermore, lavender essential oil
speeds up the healing process of scrapes, bruises and insect bites or stings.
Lavender oil is mild enough that it doesn't need a carrier oil; it can be used directly on the skin to do its magic.
 
If you are suffering from Athlete's foot or other fungal skin infections lemongrass essential oil should be your go-to
remedy, since it is considered the best essential oil to treat fungal infections. Furthermore, it can be used to sterilize
pores, serves as a natural toner and strengthens skin tissue, making it an effective cleanser for all skin types.
However, if you have sensitive skin, lemongrass oil may create a rash, discomfort or even a burning sensation. Also,
pregnant women should not use lemongrass essential oil because it stimulates menstrual flow which on very rare
occasions may lead to a miscarriage.

 

That said it's always good practice to use a carrier oil, as essential oils are volatile and will evaporate before completing their task, with the one exception noted above.

 

Here's a couple from my book of cures;

 

Plantain Ointment

Apply a lump of the ointment to the entry point of any infection, puncture wound, bee sting, snake bite,
or other venomous bite. Place a band-aid over the area and leave on until melted and dissipating, then
replace with a new lump. Do not clean off, just add more if and as needed.
 
Plantain Ointment (2 oz)
This ointment is always made with the fresh plantain leaves. I am non-plussed with what is being made
commercially, so I usually make my own. Ointments are all made as described below, but with plantain
we always use the fresh, undried leaves as the dried leaves do not work for this purpose. They are very
good for lots of things, but not for drawing out venom and poison. These must be fresh, undried.
Ointments at my house are made by filling a container (usually a glass bread pan) with the herbs as
tightly packed as I can get them. I always use cut herbs for an ointment. Over this I pour extra virgin
olive oil or Bertolli extra light olive oil. The herbs should be covered by an inch of oil in the breadpan
model. Next to it I put a glass container (usually a pint jar) with enough beeswax so that when it is
melted it equals 1/8 the total volume of oil that you used (so you should measure how much oil you add
to the herbs). These are placed in the oven at 180-200 Degrees F. This is kept here for 4 hours. Note: we
have had a little more control over heat using a toaster oven and many companies use lower
temperatures in a chaffing dish for 24-72 hours to avoid damaging with heat many of the delicate
constituents of the herbs. I personally have never seen the benefit except in a handful of cases (arnica
and calendula, for example, both flowers), so I use the oven and I believe this makes the strongest
ointment. Strict raw foodists may feel better about the chaffing dish plan. I repeat, however, that the
goal here is potency to save lives. We will worry about perfection when the emergency is past!
The herbs in the ointment should turn brown and crisp as the value is drawn into the ointment. In the
case of plantain, the ointment will dry green!
When we are done, we take the herbs and oil and strain it through a wire strainer into a container with a
wide mouth that can be used to dispense the ointment. Then the wax is added and stirred in while it
cools. Often, I put it into a pan of cold water to help cool it faster. I will also often make up more wax
than I think I need since consistency varies and more wax may be needed to make it solid enough to not
leak out of the container easily. The ointment can be tested by dipping a finger or a wooden spoon into
it and then into cold/ice water. The ointment sets up and can be tested for firmness, telling whether
more wax is desirable or not. When you are content with the mixture, leave to set up fully and put a
tight lid on to keep it good indefinitely.
 
YDC (pwd)
Used for hemorrhoids, prolapsed, candida, low iron, low back pain. Kills candida and heals weak tissue in
the lower pelvic region. Tea is used as douch and as tea to drink. Powder is stirred into water and used
as an anal implant or stirred into juice and given to children with thrush top or bottom. For low back
pain, may be taken in capsules or drunk as tea.
 
YDC (pwd 4 oz)
This product cannot any longer be purchased made according to the original recipe. For the majority of
its usefulness to us, the original recipe is the only thing that works. The other formulas do not work for
fungal infections well at all. The recipe is as follows:
6 parts oak bar
3 parts mullein herb
4 parts yellow dock root
3 parts walnut bark or leaves
6 parts comfrey root
1 part lobelia
3 parts marshmallow root
 
This is always made as powder for our purposes. It is important to purchase these herbs already
powdered as powdering roots is tough business once they are dried.

 

:) 


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#40 PapaGheny

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 03:29 AM

Thank you for sharing your recipes Wyrd. Particularly the plantain ointment. I have been planing out a new ointment for insect bites and stings I want to have ready by next summer. Buckhorn and basil are the main contributors. Taking the methods you used with the plantain into account may be a great help.

 

By the way I've been running in to the dried vs. fresh issue with plantain used for drawing as well. For storage I have found freezing it spread out on a plate keeps the better part of the potency.


Edited by PapaGheny, 03 November 2016 - 03:33 AM.

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