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Topical Infection stories, remedies, or advice

infections infection Topical infection

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#1 PapaGheny

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Posted 03 April 2016 - 05:11 PM

Topical infections like staph infection for instance are very common. Some times their easily handled other times they are a maze of complications. At times they are of little consequence, other times deadly. When I must deal with these situations it is great to be armed with a few good remedies. However, I also find they can often be case by case on how to deal with them. This means that when looking at the infection little bits of stories or advice keep popping up to help guide the way. In that spirit I thought it might be right handy to start a place for remedies and stories on that topic.

So, here is my start of it.
I would start with staph likes moisture for a breeding grounds. I try to keep the area clean and dry. It hates that. I say wash the site with soap and water, and rinse with clean water and blot dry about three times a day.

Also, working with infections ware gloves or wash your hands a lot and touch as little as possible. Some infections do like to get around. Hand sanitizer is your friend here, if you don't have it rubbing alcohol or 80+ proof booze. I have many times also used vinegar or wine if that's what I had. Some ancient physicians even preached washing your hands with red wine before and after treatment. I guess they didn't need germ theory to see that what they touched on one patent showed up on the next in a day or two.

Most of the more aggressive things I do involve. Garlic and/or apple cider vinegar ether together or alone.

A vinegar wash a couple times a day has really helped.

A garlic-vinegar swob morning and night has been grim death to staph.

And, a story,
A few years ago a troubled wife show up at my house. Her husband had a staph infection on his belly. It seems he had been to the doctor and was given broad spectrum antibiotics. This did nothing. He went back and they declared it mrsa (note there was no testing done). Now they gave him the targeted antibiotic for the most common mrsa strain in the area. It did nothing.
Back to the doctor this time they tell him that it is his weight. He is about 500lb/226kg this means low blood flow taking the meds to the area and the dose can't be met. They tell him they are done with it, and to goto the hospital if it gets too bad. His insurance would not cover that so a week in the hospital at his expense. That was not an option. It got worse the doc still just told them “good luck”. The insurance co. told them they where on their own.
When I walked in the infection was the size of a grapefruit and was open. He had trouble reaching the spot so his wife was now his nurse. I showed her how to clean it, cover it, and wash her hands before and after. Then told her to clean the house with bleach spray cleaner, and to use it on the suffices of the house once a day. This always seems to cut down spreading through the family and healing time to me. Then I showed up once a day and used a compress of garlic-vinegar for fifteen minutes.
By the second day it was already shrinking. The fourth day it was nearly gone so I stopped the compress. I gave his wife a light vinegar wash to use for the next two days, and an aloe wash for the two days after that to help heal things up. This came with the reassurance that she had done great taking care of things, and that she could run call on me if needed.
The next I saw them they reported that all was fine and not even a scar was left.

So, there is a start I hope to hear some of your infection remedies, advice, and stories.


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#2 BeauBoi

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Posted 08 April 2016 - 08:20 PM

Thank you for sharing! I have some an old book of my grandmother's, around here somewhere, that has tips, suggestions, and remedies for ailments. She was a truly gifted healer. I will see if I can find it and post some of the more interesting ones.
Great Topic!
Thanks,
~Beau

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#3 Zombee

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 03:26 PM

In humid summer heat, I will get a peeling and bleeding in the crease of my groin, where leg meets torso. It burns. I have washed, dried, talcum powdered to some effect. I also have had good luck with a strong "tea" of chamomile, With 3tea bags to a cup of water and steep 10min., then cool. Apply as spray or with cotton ball. Also helps heat rash to cool...so does Witch Hazel.
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#4 Kalinia

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 09:28 PM

Ty for sharing! A lot of essential oils a have anti microbial and anti fungal properties. Some of my favorites are red thyme and tea tree. Definitely takes a lot of research though because oils can harm badly just as much as they can heal.
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#5 Zombee

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 10:12 PM

Oh yes. I've used tea tree soap and done the Mexican Hat Dance for ten minutes, while singing " get it off, get it off". I have that DOH routine down pat.
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#6 PapaGheny

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Posted 29 May 2016 - 11:48 PM

Yep, tea tree can be some strong stuff indeed.

 

I'm really just starting to use essential oils more. Up till now it has mostly been preparations I could make at home from herbs in the kitchen or that grow easily here. Using more oils has defiantly been handy so far.

 

Zombee you mentioned heat rash, in the Diaper Rash topic RoseRed talked about a talc and cinnamon powder that sounded like a good one.

And, I will have to keep in mind the chamomile tea thank you. I've been looking at more uses for it since my last two harvests have been good.


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#7 Belle

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 04:46 AM

That was great PapaGheny,,,,,I wish I knew about that in the past because we had problems with staph a couple of times. It was a living nightmare for a while.

 

One of the situations was caused by essential oils. The person was obsessed with them and thought more was better, but he developed an allergy from overuse which lead to rash, and then infection and the home remedy was massive doses of tea tree oil which only fanned the flames....if you can imagine. The garlic vinegar might have worked.  Because of that experience, I don't really like essential oils because I can't stand the smell...it brings back memories.


Edited by Belle, 30 May 2016 - 04:53 AM.

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#8 PapaGheny

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 05:18 PM

I hear ya Belle. Like Kalinia said if someone wants to use essential oils they should surely learn about them first. I've seen burns from not diluting them proper and folk that didn't know they had an allergy because they never encountered a dose with that concentration. I've never encountered one developing an allergy from it, but I can believe it.

 

And, staph can most definitely be a nightmare. I spent a lot of time studying it and its treatment after my folk nearly lost two of us to it. while being treated for it. An otherwise healthy 2 year old and a not so healthy 23 year old, but to be fare both were MRSA cases. I think the most important things I learned were, if a doctor is available and will properly treat it let them, most doctors wont treat it properly(according to the CDC treatment plans) even in cities, get it quick its faster than you might think, and what you can do went there is no useful doctors around. Its one I would urge anyone to learn about, leaning to heal or not.

 

So I have another one I just got into my books. Twice over the years I have had an infection on the roof of my mouth. They were likely food born bacteria that found a scratch. In both cases in the course of one day they became an uncomfortable puss filled cyst about the size of a small marble. The first time I used Listerine for 1 min twice daily rinsed with clean water 5 times a day to keep it clean and to help fight it back. Then I chewed down a fresh garlic clove once a day as an antibiotic. This was of course on top of normal oral hygiene and it was gone in a little over a week.

The second time was last winter. I did the same, but on the first night I mixed,

 

1 tsp clove vinegar

2 tsp garlic vinegar

 

I dipped a swob in it and used it to clean the spot and gum line where bacteria likes to hang out. Then I dipped a new swob and held it on the cyst for 15 min. I only used this one dose of the mixture. In 7 hours it shrunk significantly. In 21 hour it was gone without a trace. I continued the garlic and clean water for the rest of the week to be sure the infection cleared my system. Needless to say I was quite happy with this.

Not long ago a friend of the family stopped in. They had a very simulator infection that started the day before. I mixed them up a dose and they did the same treatment. They got the same results on the same time table.

 

Notes; The mixture left that spot feeling tender and raw for a day or so. I wouldn't want to hold the swob with my tong. It has some high acid levels that could cause a sore if exposed that long. I prefer to take the garlic 2 hours after eating. It can upset an empty stomach and I hear its less effective on a full stomach. For kids over 2 and those that can't bring themselves to chew I down dip the garlic clove in honey and swallow it like a pill. I think it seems less effective this way but I'm told there is not a lot of difference.

 

I figure this one is definitely going prove handy to me.


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#9 westofthemoon

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 06:45 PM

I use plant-infused oils (yarrow, plantain,etc) & honey for surface infections. It depends on the infection & what kind it is (viral, bacterial, etc). Haven't had to deal with mrsa yet (luckily).
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#10 RoseRed

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 11:16 AM

A study came out of, I believe it was Finland, a few years ago about the effectiveness usnea in preparation form for treating staph, strep and MRSA.  There a lot of information out there for those that feel like googling.


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#11 Oroboros

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 07:41 PM

West of the moon:

What has been your experience with honey?
I recently discovered how incredibly effective it is as a humectant, and have read about it having significant antibacterial properties. I have not attempted to use it as an antibacterial agent- except in recognizing that its presence in salves and lip balms not only is very moisturizing, and smells great, but keeps the salve itself from spoiling because it inhibits bacterial proliferation.

The treatment for most all skin rashes and wounds hinges on the principle "if it is dry make it moist and if it is moist make it dry". So, I assumed honey would be a poor choice for most wounds as it would add additional wetness to anything with any type of open area or drainage. Have you found this to be the case?

(Edited typos)

Edited by Oroboros, 31 May 2016 - 07:44 PM.

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#12 aefre

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 09:56 PM

Hey Oroboros, sorry to interrupt, but I've always been taught that honey has excellent, natural, anti-bacterial, healing properties.  Being a lazy witch, I used to buy a generic moisturiser, and mix honey and lavender oil with it.  Having 2 x boys who were constantly 'wounded' in one way or another, falling out of trees etc, this made the perfect salve for surface wounds.  They healed in no time.  And, if the wound was wet, I'd dry it as much as I could, then apply it, and cover it with a dry dressing.  The moisturiser was very 'light' by the way,  not a thick creamy thing. It also seemed to draw out any 'yukky' stuff.  This was though, just for surface wounds. 


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#13 Oroboros

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 10:02 PM

Interesting, that makes sense.  I wondered if that would work, just hadn't tried it yet.  

 

I did make little jars of lip balm with honey and coconut oil and I don't remember what else - a  little of this and a little of that.  However it had a high honey content and you could literally feel moisture being drawn to your lips.  Like I said- the humectant factor is amazing.  And even thought the balms were natural they lasted many months with no signs of turning bad.


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#14 Oroboros

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 10:04 PM

Im thinking about how fabulous one must smell wearing a mix of garlic and vinegar...  Infection AND vampire free- hell yes.:)


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#15 Belle

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 03:12 AM

It's better then the oozing smell of infection... Yikes!  


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#16 PapaGheny

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 05:10 AM

Oh, I never said it smelled good. It'll make your noise hair curl. And, yep the undead may just want to wait for less offensive pray. In fact the only good thing about the smell is that it works pretty quick so you don't have to put up with it long. That and maybe it will teach folk to wash the cut when they get it then keep it clean. But, I'm still glad to have it since I don't typically have to buy anything to make it (except yeast I've gotten lazy there) and it seems to works where others wont.

 

Ya know I don't use honey enough. I've had good results on scrapes and cuts every time, I just don't think of it right off. And that's a good call mixing with generic moisturizers Aefre. I may need to try that.

 

I also haven't real used much yarrow. It'll grow well around here and I've been thinking more about putting it to work lately. I would be real interested to hear how folk are using it and what kind of results your getting.

 

Now, my life would be a lot different without buckhorn(Plantago Lanceolata) and broadleaf(Plantago Major) plantain. I use them for a lot of things. Scrapes, bug bits, tired feet, and chest congestion, to name a few. Come to think of it broadleaf plantain and dandelion were lunch the other day.

 

Red Rose I did find stuff on that study with a quick search. It looks like some interesting findings thank you for bringing it up.


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#17 RoseRed

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Posted 01 June 2016 - 05:47 PM

You're quite welcome.  I always have a back up jar macerating.  Good stuff!


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#18 aefre

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 03:13 PM

Does anyone, have any practical applications for Knapweed.  It's an old herb, that I'm cultivating in my garden.  The only references I have are in  Culpeper's Complete Herbal, so I'd be really interested to hear, if anyone has any modern, practical uses for it.


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#19 PapaGheny

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 06:54 PM

This is the part where Mountain Witch is likely to give us a big “I told you so!” and send us out to pull weeds for not using scientific names.

 

We are likely looking for Common Knapweed(Centaurea Nigra) or Greater Knapweed(Centaurea Scabiosa). I have never used it and would want to do my homework before trying but I found a few references from a quick look for the scientific names. Culpeper's lists greater and “The Herbalist's Bible by Julie Burton-Seal and Matthew seal” list the common taken from John Parkinson's work as having the same or simulator property. I also found some stuff online searching the scientific names. Seems it was used for scabies, stopping blood flow, stubborn wounds, bruising, and swelling in the mouth and of the finger nails.

 

It looks pretty good I think I want to look at it further. Thanks for mentioning it.


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#20 aefre

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Posted 04 June 2016 - 02:53 PM

Hey PG, just to add, what 'frustrates' me about Culpepper's, is, that when he wrote it (somewhere in the 1600's), he didn't put Latin names, or pictures, or anything.  Because, he assumed, and quite rightly so, that everyone knew what he was talking about.  And they would have done.  In the area I grew up in, we had names for all the local plants/weeds etc and could recognise them immediately.  I now live by the sea, and have had to learn all the local flora from scratch.

 

To be honest, the only reason I'm growing it, is because I found it in a garden centre, as part of their 'old English plants' section. And, when it flowers, it looks like a thistle!

 

Thanks for responding, if you find anything else out, I'd love to know.

 

PS I love the fact that you live on a mountain :)


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