Jump to content


Photo
* * * * - 1 votes

Sarah Anne Lawless flying ointment Faq

flying ointment sarah anne lawless

  • Please log in to reply
110 replies to this topic

#41 Caps

Caps

    Phytokinesist

  • Moderators
  • 1,095 posts

Posted 02 May 2015 - 02:16 PM

People have a tendency to overwater plants. Consider mandrake's natural climate around the Mediterranean. Blood meal is a really commonsoil aamendment they sell it at any lawn and garden center. Bone meal is extremely important for flowering plants too.
"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#42 Anara

Anara

    aspire beyond fear of death (Bhairavi)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,165 posts

Posted 02 May 2015 - 06:02 PM

People have a tendency to overwater plants. Consider mandrake's natural climate around the Mediterranean. Blood meal is a really commonsoil aamendment they sell it at any lawn and garden center. Bone meal is extremely important for flowering plants too.


Thanks for the helpful suggestions, Caps! I will pick up some blood & bone meal. Do you, by chance, recommend a certain soil mix to get the mandrake started? Both times I started them in Jiffy peat starter trays and they seemed to do o.k.-at first anyway.

re: the watering-I do believe I could have been over watering them, even though the soil drains well in those starter trays. I don't know what else it could have been. They were doing beautifully up until I watered them.

  • 0
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you will always long to return." ~ Leonardo Da Vinci

#43 Caps

Caps

    Phytokinesist

  • Moderators
  • 1,095 posts

Posted 02 May 2015 - 08:21 PM

I don't really recommend dept. store soil mixes but if you can find it at an organics store Fox Farm Ocean Forest is one of the best bagged soils out there... It's not cheap though. I struggle with germinating mandrake too so I don't really have any suggestions other than a cold stratification soak. Most plants will let you know when they want water

Edited by Caps, 02 May 2015 - 08:22 PM.

"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#44 Christine

Christine

    Marsh Wiggle

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 449 posts

Posted 03 May 2015 - 12:58 PM

My mandrakes grew fine in regular potting soil, and even got large enough to repot. I just kept the soil moist, never wet. Getting an initial rate of 50% germination seemed fine to me, as I expected staggered germination: it's not a tame plant. My mistake was not hiding it well enough, which led to it getting dug up by witchlings before its time. I did water with blood a few times, but that wasn't a horticultural thing.

Making flying salve is way down on my list because firstly I don't usually need that, secondly naturalization and alraunes come before salves, and finally I'm still honing my salve-making skills. It's definitely on the list, make no mistake, just not at the top.

Um, what's wrong with salves being gentle? Isn't the point of applying instead of ingesting to soften the interaction with the poison?

  • 0
Don't drink from the river, drink from the well.

#45 RoseRed

RoseRed

    . . . Not a big believer in . . . cowinkydink ;)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,460 posts

Posted 03 May 2015 - 02:38 PM

I had a puppy that LOVED bonemeal. He kept digging up a brand new rose bush to eat the soil amendment LOLOL. (We finally gave up and went with a different one and put up a small fence LOLOL
  • 0
When my wings get tired I grab my broom.

#46 Christine

Christine

    Marsh Wiggle

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 449 posts

Posted 31 May 2015 - 04:04 PM

Actually I went back and checked my records again... the mandrake seed pack was half of what I remember, so sorry. The germination rate was twice what I reported here.
  • 0
Don't drink from the river, drink from the well.

#47 Lucea's Child

Lucea's Child

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 185 posts

Posted 02 June 2015 - 10:11 PM

I've collected many of her ointments over the last five or so years, along with some of the oils she's put out in the past. What I had begun to find frustrating is that I can't find a decent supplier for things like mandrake root or belladonna. Either it's too expensive or I can't trust the source. Too many times I've purchased "mandrake" and it's turned out to be mayapple. So many times the supplier lists the official latin name as mandragora officinarum when it should be podophyllum. Gah!

I'd followed her blog for several years and watched her grow her plants and she actually knew more than any of the local stores/people in my neck of the woods so I thought I'd give her stuff a go and I'm glad I did. I start with a very small amount and test it, then work up a bit from there. Some of them have worked better for me than others, but none have given me a negative reaction so far, thank goodness. I find the ointments very helpful and useful in my work but I've been either pregnant or nursing for the last year and a half and haven't been able to give them a good go in a while. I'm finally at a point where I can now delve back into their use and I'm quite excited!

Ultimately I'd like to grow my own but I'm not overly confident that my young children wouldn't somehow ingest some of the plants. Until that day comes I'll be grateful for the very few who are knowledgable enough to grow them, make the ointments and be willing to sell them.


I have her Aves ointment. I talked about it in the flying ointments thread. I had a reaction to the belladonna (itching), and that was only with a tiny smear. Really disappointing, because I have this whole tin I can't use :sad:



I'm sorry to hear that, WotM! If you would be interested in selling it I'd be happy to purchase it for the cost you initially paid - you could get your money/shipping costs back that way and it would have a good home. If interested, send me a message.

Edited by Lucea's Child, 02 June 2015 - 10:15 PM.

  • 0
“One doesn't discover new lands without consenting
to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.”

— Andre Gide

#48 Stacey

Stacey

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts

Posted 03 June 2015 - 12:29 AM

Ultimately I'd like to grow my own but I'm not overly confident that my young children wouldn't somehow ingest some of the plants. Until that day comes I'll be grateful for the very few who are knowledgable enough to grow them, make the ointments and be willing to sell them.


I grow mine in an enclosed bird cage, not because of children issues for me but more so because none of my poisons with the exception of Datura and Black Nightshade - though this one is not poisonous in the strictest sense, are not native or widespread weeds in my area. It's containment so they all grow in one place and not spread (very carefully timed seed harvest). But do you have something similar you could grow them in? Something that could be easily locked against little inquisitive fingers?

  • 0
"The mind is not a book, to be opened at will and examined at leisure. Thoughts are not etched on the inside of skulls, to be perused by an invader. The mind is a complex and many-layered thing." Severus Snape - HP and the Order of the Phoenix

#49 Caps

Caps

    Phytokinesist

  • Moderators
  • 1,095 posts

Posted 03 June 2015 - 02:51 AM

I grow mine in an enclosed bird cage, not because of children issues for me but more so because none of my poisons with the exception of Datura and Black Nightshade - though this one is not poisonous in the strictest sense, are not native or widespread weeds in my area. It's containment so they all grow in one place and not spread (very carefully timed seed harvest). But do you have something similar you could grow them in? Something that could be easily locked against little inquisitive fingers?

S. nigrum complex plants, or black nightshade, are really cool. They're not terribly toxic and are the most commonly eaten wild edible in most of the world (the leaves have to be boiled first and water discarded and the berries must be ripe). Europeans have long considered them "toxic" because the ripe black berries resemble smaller belladonna berries, I guess better to be safe than sorry. I'm growing three "species" of them this year, I've got an already impressive 9 month old (started it indoors in September) S. nigrum that's pushing out popolo berries already.

Posted Image

They produce some of the sweetest, most delicious berries you can ever taste.


in the nature of the "tangent topic" of the thread though, I'll post some of my baby Datura inoxia plants too :biggrin:

Posted Image


These are/were my remaining henbane (H. niger) plants before the 95 degree Virginia heat got to them. I lost one and the others might not make it but I was able to save leaves and the root. The little guys in the box planter are Siberian skullcap, Sculletaria baikalensis, most of those didn't like the heat either but most of them seem to be making it.

Posted Image
Posted Image

this is a beautiful wild solanum (some would call it an obnoxious weed because it is lol) called horsenettle or sand briar (Solanum carolinense. This particular plant probably comes from a rhizome that's at least a year or more old. The flower is about the size of a half dollar

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

Solanum carolinense is definitely dangerous to eat. The solanine content is too high in both leaves and ripe berries to fool with. Solanine poisoning can cause severe diarrhea, abdominal convulsions, and potentially death. It should be treated with the same respect as Solanum dulcamara, bittersweet or woody nightshade.

Edited by Caps, 03 June 2015 - 03:12 AM.

"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#50 Lucea's Child

Lucea's Child

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 185 posts

Posted 03 June 2015 - 02:56 PM

I grow mine in an enclosed bird cage, not because of children issues for me but more so because none of my poisons with the exception of Datura and Black Nightshade - though this one is not poisonous in the strictest sense, are not native or widespread weeds in my area. It's containment so they all grow in one place and not spread (very carefully timed seed harvest). But do you have something similar you could grow them in? Something that could be easily locked against little inquisitive fingers?



This is a good idea! I do have a birdcage that was meant for precisely that sitting unused in my garage at the moment. However, it would still pose a threat to curious fingers who could just as easily pull pretty berries through the bars. I love this idea though! I knew I was keeping it for something... :smile:


For those that grow baneful herbs, do you also have young children? If so, how to you cope with safety measures?

...perhaps that question is best suited for a new topic.

Edited by Lucea's Child, 03 June 2015 - 02:57 PM.

  • 0
“One doesn't discover new lands without consenting
to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.”

— Andre Gide

#51 Kaye

Kaye

    Advanced Member

  • Seekers
  • PipPipPip
  • 57 posts

Posted 07 June 2015 - 10:05 AM

I have been nursing a baby mandrake for a bit over 4 years now. It was not easy to find here, only found the one seller and they posted me the tiniest little plant.
  • 0

#52 Anara

Anara

    aspire beyond fear of death (Bhairavi)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,165 posts

Posted 11 June 2015 - 05:18 PM

I don't really recommend dept. store soil mixes but if you can find it at an organics store Fox Farm Ocean Forest is one of the best bagged soils out there... It's not cheap though. I struggle with germinating mandrake too so I don't really have any suggestions other than a cold stratification soak. Most plants will let you know when they want water


ended up doing a mix of organic seed starter plant mix that I had on hand, a bit of sand, and bonemeal to experiment....so we'll see. I have some autumn mandrake seeds from horizon herbs and some white mandrake seeds straight from overseas planted.

Thanks for the recommendation though-might have to try that soil at some point.

  • 0
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you will always long to return." ~ Leonardo Da Vinci

#53 Anara

Anara

    aspire beyond fear of death (Bhairavi)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,165 posts

Posted 07 August 2015 - 02:21 PM

A quick thank you to everyone who gave me great tips-especially the bone meal/blood meal advice. I have a young, healthy mandrake plant! I think the bone meal made a difference.
  • 0
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you will always long to return." ~ Leonardo Da Vinci

#54 MarlaDurden

MarlaDurden

    Advanced Member

  • Seekers
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Posted 07 January 2016 - 06:10 AM

I'm in Australia and I'd absolutely love to make some flying ointment myself as Sarah's ointments aren't legal to import here :sad: but that makes me think that none of the other plants traditionally used in them would be accessible here either. I'll have to look into that and find out if there are any plants that grow here which can be used as substitutes...


Edit: spelling

Edited by MarlaDurden, 07 January 2016 - 06:10 AM.

  • 0

#55 Kaye

Kaye

    Advanced Member

  • Seekers
  • PipPipPip
  • 57 posts

Posted 07 January 2016 - 10:54 AM

I'm in Australia and I'd absolutely love to make some flying ointment myself as Sarah's ointments aren't legal to import here :sad: but that makes me think that none of the other plants traditionally used in them would be accessible here either. I'll have to look into that and find out if there are any plants that grow here which can be used as substitutes...


Edit: spelling

I'm in Australia as well, I know there is at least one seller of Mandrake and other plants in the country. Only issues may be if you're in Tas due to quarantine restrictions

  • 0

#56 RoseRed

RoseRed

    . . . Not a big believer in . . . cowinkydink ;)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,460 posts

Posted 07 January 2016 - 02:45 PM

What do the Aboriginals use for spirit work?

It's an indigenous culture. Granted, what I've seen comes from documentaries but, like other indigenous peoples - they know the land and what grows on it.

  • 0
When my wings get tired I grab my broom.

#57 MarlaDurden

MarlaDurden

    Advanced Member

  • Seekers
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 12:20 PM

I'm in Australia as well, I know there is at least one seller of Mandrake and other plants in the country. Only issues may be if you're in Tas due to quarantine restrictions

Not in Tas :D do you happen to have a link to the seller's website / contact details?

  • 0

#58 MarlaDurden

MarlaDurden

    Advanced Member

  • Seekers
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 01:08 PM

What do the Aboriginals use for spirit work?

It's an indigenous culture. Granted, what I've seen comes from documentaries but, like other indigenous peoples - they know the land and what grows on it.

From the research I've done in the past, (and from what I've been told by Indigenous Australians when I lived in the Top End) the plant most commonly used to induce trance is Pituri, the active ingredient of which is nicotine.

  • 0

#59 Anara

Anara

    aspire beyond fear of death (Bhairavi)

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,165 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 02:10 PM

There is one shop I know of that makes ointments and is located in Australia...might be worth it to at least check it out for ideas. I have never purchased from the shop but it seems to get good reviews.

Belladonna & Bones
http://belladonnaandbones.com/

Edited by Anara, 08 January 2016 - 02:11 PM.

  • 0
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you will always long to return." ~ Leonardo Da Vinci

#60 MarlaDurden

MarlaDurden

    Advanced Member

  • Seekers
  • PipPipPip
  • 52 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 02:24 PM

There is one shop I know of that makes ointments and is located in Australia...might be worth it to at least check it out for ideas. I have never purchased from the shop but it seems to get good reviews.

Belladonna & Bones
http://belladonnaandbones.com/

Thanks Anara! I'll check it out :)

  • 0