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Fire in witchcraft?


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#21 Caps

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 12:55 AM

The type of wood can be important for flame as well.  Burn length, heat, intensity, color etc. as well as whatever magical attributes the wood has.  For example for heat only a handful of woods have high enough BTU rates to produce deep blues such as black locust, swamp oak, and Osage orange.  Softwoods like pine are very sooty and produce a lot of tar/creosote.  Some woods pop and crackle a lot and some woods don't even need to be seasoned before burning.  There's a lot of different things to look into when choosing a wood.

 

:wiccanpie:

 

I just wanted to use that smiley


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#22 Guest_monsnoleedra_*

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 03:28 AM

Want to see the difference in woods, burn time, burn intensity and heat, explosive force try heating your house with wood for one winter.  You can learn a lot about fire and fuel sources that way.  Trying to melt crystals and turn them to glass I think would show it very well also.


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#23 hawkwind

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 01:53 PM

SO true Monso, I camp a lot in the summer and am very picky about the wood I burn especially burn time I like a wood that is going to burn steady for a long time. Pine burns up way to fast. I have a lot of ash and iron wood, iron wood is hard to get started but once you do you can burn that all night bc of it's density.


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#24 Barnstock

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 02:42 PM

Want to see the difference in woods, burn time, burn intensity and heat, explosive force try heating your house with wood for one winter.  You can learn a lot about fire and fuel sources that way.  Trying to melt crystals and turn them to glass I think would show it very well also.

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Heated with wood for years and loved it. Would order a load of oak and ash every spring, cut, split and stacked it by hand well into summer, as well as harvesting some hickory and maple from my own property.  The whole process teaches you a lot about wood. Some splits better green, some after it has dried a while. The really nasty twisted up knotty pieces went in the bonfire pile. Some had faces that I would bring out with my chainsaw and then finish up with chisels. My youngest son still has one in his room, it became his when he started talking to it as a baby, others went to friend's gardens.But back to the subject of fire:

 

Evergreens represent death, so I have used them to attract and speak to the dead, especially from graveyards, also, one mentor taught me to make incense from the dead flowers left on graves for the same purpose, all with the keeper's permission of course. Meditating on the flames from burning oak always seemed to give answers to difficult questions, while ash tended to be more useful for spellwork. Green hickory burns hot and throws off a lot of energy all at once. My father liked to burn apple in the fireplace when I was a kid, but I couldn't stand the smell, so I never experimented with it.

 

I almost always have something burning during workings, usually candles, because they interact with the atmosphere so well, though candle colors aren't all that important to me. And of course there is the ubiquitous little charcoal in the pot for herbs and incense. I also like those little oil lamps with the colored glass flues for really creating a mood altering atmosphere that is especially helpful when working with others.

 

Thinking about this has made me nostalgic for my old property and a big bonfire.


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#25 Guest_monsnoleedra_*

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 03:12 PM

Evergreens are an interesting wood.  Things like pines, spruces, etc have square needles and can be rolled in your hands.  In some ways very liminal in that there are always four sides or aspects to everything when you deal with them.  Then the sap or blood changes as the season changes but also in reference to how the cones work.  Then you can look at the needle clusters and lengths at times and use those differently.  Some have groups of 3, some groups of 4 a few groups of 5, lots of ways to read them.  Yet things like Hemlock, Cedar, etc have flat needles or fronds.  Very two sided and two dimensional in usage, basic yes or no type stuff though the basic notion of life / death and duality of things is really present in their greenery.

 

Interesting that for the East and perhaps northwest the Cedar is a purification tree.  The Hemlock for some is a sacred tree, especially in the Northwest for some nations.  Have never really heard of the pines or spruces being sacred in any capacity similar to the Cedar or Hemlock.  


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#26 RoseRed

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 03:48 PM

We've been checking out how the different trees burn in the fireplace this fall.  It seems we've settled into starting oak with some small pieces of cedar. 

 

As a witch, I have to say that I am totally loving having a fire burning all day when it's cold.  It's a beautiful thing.


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#27 Autumn Moon

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 03:55 PM

The type of wood can be important for flame as well.  Burn length, heat, intensity, color etc. as well as whatever magical attributes the wood has.  For example for heat only a handful of woods have high enough BTU rates to produce deep blues such as black locust, swamp oak, and Osage orange.  Softwoods like pine are very sooty and produce a lot of tar/creosote.  Some woods pop and crackle a lot and some woods don't even need to be seasoned before burning.  There's a lot of different things to look into when choosing a wood.

 

:wiccanpie:

 

I just wanted to use that smiley

____

 

I agree about the physical properties of different kinds of wood/fuel, but not about it making a difference to the flame qualities of magic, at least not ime.


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#28 Autumn Moon

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 06:05 PM

We've been checking out how the different trees burn in the fireplace this fall.  It seems we've settled into starting oak with some small pieces of cedar. 

 

As a witch, I have to say that I am totally loving having a fire burning all day when it's cold.  It's a beautiful thing.

____

 

For sure. I miss our fireplace. We would keep it burning for many hours. I liked to use hardwoods for their clean and hot burn, which meant less soot build up in the chimney (chimney fires due to soot and creosote build up is very dangerous, and will burn down your home in no time at all).


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#29 RoseRed

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 06:44 PM

Oh, I appreciate the warning.  Creosote is not something to play with.


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#30 Caps

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 06:49 PM

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I agree about the physical properties of different kinds of wood/fuel, but not about it making a difference to the flame qualities of magic, at least not ime.


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Hmm different trees have different magic properties, why wouldn't you apply that to their wood?

"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 09:08 PM

I know for me I find that different types of wood produce different colors of flame but also how long a color remains due to heat, etc.  Yet that aside one important difference is also the coal beds each type of wood tends to leave and how the heat, shape and size breaks down.  The beds are as important as the flame itself when you consider libations and offerings and having them consumed by the active fire and the residue heat.

 

Figure some wood burns and breaks down into an ash almost immediately.  Other stay so tight that the coal is as dense as the wood from which it was created.  Even to retain the ring network of the inner core and show them visibly in the glowing structure.  Then as they break down to remain as clumps and relatively hard vice say soft woods that burn to almost nothing and leave a dusty type ash.


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#32 Autumn Moon

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Posted 05 December 2014 - 08:42 AM

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Hmm different trees have different magic properties, why wouldn't you apply that to their wood?

_________

 

True, but I have not found that it applies to the flames. The flame works the same for your intent regardless of the wood used to create the flame. At least that has been my experience. I agree that the ashes contain the altered magical properties of the tree.


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#33 Michele

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 01:51 PM

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For sure. I miss our fireplace. We would keep it burning for many hours. I liked to use hardwoods for their clean and hot burn, which meant less soot build up in the chimney (chimney fires due to soot and creosote build up is very dangerous, and will burn down your home in no time at all).

 

My mother was telling me stories the other day, and she was saying when she was little, and money was very short and they couldn't afford a chimney sweep how their chimney would sometimes "accidentally" catch on fire and by the time the fire burned out the chimney would be be all cleared, lol. But if you had the coin, you'd pay the sweep...  you did what you had to do...

 

M


Edited by Michele, 06 December 2014 - 01:52 PM.

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#34 Autumn Moon

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 04:19 PM

My mother was telling me stories the other day, and she was saying when she was little, and money was very short and they couldn't afford a chimney sweep how their chimney would sometimes "accidentally" catch on fire and by the time the fire burned out the chimney would be be all cleared, lol. But if you had the coin, you'd pay the sweep...  you did what you had to do...

 

M

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I knew one person who could not afford the sweep or insurance, and they lost everything through a chimney fire.

 

"In case of chimney fire, the local fire department  should be called immediately: there is a risk of the chimney failing, and/or over heating adjoining structures, which could cause the fire to spread to other parts of the building. Additional hazards include the possible buildup of toxic gases such as carbon monoxide within the structure due to restricted flues"http://en.wikipedia....ki/Chimney_fire


Edited by Autumn Moon, 06 December 2014 - 04:19 PM.

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#35 Guest_monsnoleedra_*

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 04:27 PM

In our area a lot of the local fire dept's will come and do chimney inspections and cleanings to prevent chimney fires.  My self since I us a wood stove we have a semi closed flu so we run a metal spiked ball and chains down through the flu and clean it that way.  Then remove all the soot and stuff through the pull stone that is at the bottom or through the access portal also at the bottom on many flu's.

 

For my area though I think more fires are caused by bird's nest and such than actual soot build up in the flu.  Though the flu itself has to be in good order to begin with with no cracks, breaks or missing material.  Most of the newer ones usually have some sort of solid liner to aid in preventing the outer framing of the flu from catching fire. 


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#36 RoseRed

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 04:33 PM

I was really surprised and disappointed at how poorly built the inside of a chimney can be.  I had to have the 'guts' of the chimney rebuilt before I could sell my Mother's house.  I had always thought that they were solid brick - not aluminum tubing.  That was an eye opener.


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#37 Caps

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 04:33 PM

I have  a rather funny story about a chimney fire in my youth, since most house fires don't end in humor I think it's noteworthy although slightly off topic.

 

My dad had always cleaned the chimney himself.  He's the type that does anything he can himself, even if he doesn't know what the hell he's doing.  This is one of those instances where it bit him in the ass.  I was about 10 or so and my dad and his Army buddy were home, I don't recall anyone else being there.  They had been drinking moonshine and were drinking in the recliners in the family room while I played games in the back room.  It was around 10 at night or so and I hear a series of persistent knocks on the front door....no one answered.  Being ten years old I didn't realize that the moonshine had my dad and "uncle" passed out in nothing but their underwear in the den.  I answer and it's a frantic neighbor telling me the chimney is on fire, so I rush in really quick to the den and get up the adults who are less than happy to be moving about so quickly.  I call the fire department and tell them the chimney's on fire while my dad and uncle are rushing around collecting up the cats to take them outside to put in the garage.  All of this ends rather uneventfully but in short the two of them are standing around outside in their tightie whities talking to firemen in 20 degree weather covered in cat scratches and drunk as all get out.  My dad never DIY'd the chimney or stove pipes ever again in any home we've lived in.  Interesting that their current sweeper (who wears one of those old timey sweeper top hats <3)  has become an important contact of mine since he runs a heated greenhouse at his house year round.  He's starting a couple of "secret hybrid" pepper crosses for me this year.


"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#38 Autumn Moon

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 04:43 PM

tightie whities - LOL.


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