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#21 Caps

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 10:45 PM

Hmm I've never seen any Jack in the Pulpit around here but it certainly looks like what my web searches are turning up.

 

 

I also need some help identifying this plant if anyone possibly knows.  it's definitely a wild orchid.  I think it may be southern twayblade but the flowers don't match...it has even length sepals and petals (in comparison to the long lower sepals on a twayblade) and the notable orchid labellum (lip) extends far back behind the bloom, they look more like shadow witch orchid flowers but the plant has no chlorophyll which means it's either parasitic or depends on fungi to survive.  I'm completely confused by this one.

 

20140814_182225_zpsm52bceia.jpg

 

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any orchid nerds on here? :wink:

 

 

For comparison, here's

southern twayblade

427198833_94914f2b84.jpg

 

shadow witch orchid

10070177743_3f9135bdab_z.jpg


Edited by Capsicum, 14 August 2014 - 10:51 PM.

"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#22 bewitchingredhead

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 11:27 AM



The first pic here looks like magnolia fruit and leaves to me. The others look like some type of grape like Capsicum said. We don't get magnolia here really, so I'm not an expert on that either, but I don't think it is ever recommended to eat the fruit of magnolia, although it is not considered toxic. In some species of magnolia I know you can eat the flowers, and the leaves are use for seasoning, like bay leaves. Bottom line, these are different plants. Look at the leaves of your plant, the leaves of magnolia are like in the top pic, they even look quite a bit like bay leaves.

 

 



BWR, the pods are magnolia and the grapes are scuppernong grapes, and I am jealous.

 

 

Are they good Christine?! Some of the things I've read say they are...and even quite expensive. 

Yeah I have a ton of different plants, trees, and vines on my property. Can't believe I've missed them all before... Speaking of which, can anyone take a guess as to what these are? There are tons of them on the side of my yard next to my neighbor's. *Sorry about the brightness of the pics- I'm a night owl and these were all taken at night, which makes it harder to really see them, at least in my opinion*

 

@Solanaceae- Those weren't actual pics from my back yard. I'll go out there and take pics of it/them for better clarification. Thank you :smile:

 

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#23 Caps

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 01:00 PM

I can't tell for sure, but those look like pictures of a honeysuckle vine with some ragweed growing through it.  The little yellow flowers are actually a part of the plant below it that has leaves that look like a marigold.  We normally call that ragweed here.  Ragweed is good as a topical solution to insect bites, however it also is the number one cause of hay fever allergies.  It's an Ambrosia so it's associated with immortality in Greek and Roman mythology.  Honeysuckle (if that is in fact what the bush/vine is) is Japanese and has a multitude of medicinal uses...not sure of any magical properties it has but I'm sure there are plenty. 

 

EDIT: I just looked at my honeysuckle vines, it looks a bit different,...but if it has little yellow flowers all over it during spring it could be....the name is eluding me...starts with an "h" I believe...XD  can't remember.  People plant it in hedgerows all over the place here.


Edited by Capsicum, 29 August 2014 - 01:14 PM.

"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#24 Christine

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 10:24 AM

Bewitching, that's really not a great picture, but it looks like Heavenly Bamboo. If I saw a picture of its overall growth I could be certain. Heavenly Bamboo, or Nandina, has mostly dry but extremely pretty bright red winter berries. Culinary applications are few. I have noticed that they harbor shades readily, much as does true bamboo. And yes, bronze scuppernongs are choice.

 

Capsicum, I'm an orchid ignoramus but I know those are gorgeous wildflowers.

 

Chloe, I have an Indian Pipe growing in my garden, and I have not noticed that touching it has any effect.


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#25 Caps

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 01:05 PM

hey, looks like heavenly bamboo to me based on the pictures I just looked at :)

 

learning new things all the time :mdance:


"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#26 bewitchingredhead

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 05:57 AM

hey, looks like heavenly bamboo to me based on the pictures I just looked at :smile:

 

learning new things all the time :mdance:

 

 

Bewitching, that's really not a great picture, but it looks like Heavenly Bamboo. If I saw a picture of its overall growth I could be certain. Heavenly Bamboo, or Nandina, has mostly dry but extremely pretty bright red winter berries. Culinary applications are few. I have noticed that they harbor shades readily, much as does true bamboo. And yes, bronze scuppernongs are choice.

 

Capsicum, I'm an orchid ignoramus but I know those are gorgeous wildflowers.

 

Chloe, I have an Indian Pipe growing in my garden, and I have not noticed that touching it has any effect.

 

 

I can't tell for sure, but those look like pictures of a honeysuckle vine with some ragweed growing through it.  The little yellow flowers are actually a part of the plant below it that has leaves that look like a marigold.  We normally call that ragweed here.  Ragweed is good as a topical solution to insect bites, however it also is the number one cause of hay fever allergies.  It's an Ambrosia so it's associated with immortality in Greek and Roman mythology.  Honeysuckle (if that is in fact what the bush/vine is) is Japanese and has a multitude of medicinal uses...not sure of any magical properties it has but I'm sure there are plenty. 

 

EDIT: I just looked at my honeysuckle vines, it looks a bit different,...but if it has little yellow flowers all over it during spring it could be....the name is eluding me...starts with an "h" I believe...XD  can't remember.  People plant it in hedgerows all over the place here.

 

 

On the other side of the vacant townhouse's yard next door to me, there's actually quite a bit of bamboo stalks not intwined w/other plants, etc.!! I'll take pics of them and upload them as well. My hubby took some today of our trees, shrubs, weeds, etc. all around our front and back yard. Some of them aren't really good bc of the glare of the sun, so I'm going to take some more tomorrow in the late afternoon when the lighting is different due to all of the shading from the trees and whatnot. 

 

When my hubby saw a package of the magnolia "grapes" (the scuppernongs) at one of our local Co-ops, he was stunned bc they cost so much and had no idea that's essentially what we have growing in our yard until the other day. Since you're familiar w/them Christine, when and how would you suggest I go about cultivating and harvesting them? How can I tell when they're ripe for instance? Do I pluck them or wait for them to fall off? What time of the year is best for harvesting them? And so on... I wasn't blessed w/my mother's green thumb and even though I know a ton about herbs and plants from a medicinal perspective, as well as a magical one, I'm new to gardening and identifying plants/herbs visually (except the easy ones like mint, rosemary, lavender and several other more commonly recognizable ones- at least to me)- heck even the local and state trees I just started learning how to identify (except certain oak, pine, and dogwoods, and any one that bears common fruits like apples, citrus fruits, etc.).  

 

I just noticed my neighbor has pot marigolds growing in her front yard today for crying out loud. All I kept thinking was, "dammit if I'd known this weeks ago!" bc I just bought some calendulas for a homemade salve. And here she is with an entire yard of them! Also, I'm highly allergic to ragweeds- lol. My state is just phenomenal for people like me.  :cry: 


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I see you're getting your degree in art of the obvious~myself
Without music life would be a mistake~ Friedrich Nietzsche
Immorality: The morality of those who are having a better time~ H.L. Mencken
When nature has work to be done, she creates a genius to do it~ Ralph Waldo Emerson
We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves~ Galileo

#27 Christine

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 05:45 AM

Bewitching, I have never grown scuppernongs myself because the cuttings are also a little out of my price range, and although they were once endemic locally, that no longer seems the case. I did mention that I was jealous...

As far as culture, it is as for any American grape. They're usually pretty carefree as grapes go. The berries are ripe when they are soft and the skin slips, just like Concord grapes. Don't be surprised if the local critters get most of the harvest.

By the way, I wasn't blessed with colorful thumbs either. I'm just 'satiably  curtius, plus way too stubborn.


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#28 uncertainfuture

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 03:51 AM

Wild crafting/foraging is something I've wanted to get into for quite some time but have always been afraid of misidentifying the plants. I've gone along a few times with people who know what they're doing for a bit of foraging for food and it's always been fun. We've picked up blackberries, hawberries, elderberries, pawpaws and walnuts, along with stinging nettles.  Oh, and kudzu. A woman I foraged with used to make kudzu royal blossom jelly. (If you've ever had a fruit honey, such as pear honey, it spreads a bit like that in consistency.)

 

I'd love to learn to forage more not just for food but for medicine and other supplies.


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#29 Christine

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 06:55 AM

Uncertainfuture, this is a wonderful time to study wildcrafting. I recommend Green Dean's site as a starting place because it is so comprehensive, but there are so many excellent sources of information all around.


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#30 Caps

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 07:38 PM

I identified my mystery orchid, it's Tipularia discolor Cranefly orchid, very cool.

 

also, I was foraging and doing other "things" at the battlefield today and came across THIS which blew my mind.  I had to look it up because I had never seen it before. 

 

20140903_151829_zpsftaixez7.jpg

It's an Osage orange, which I know absolutely nothing about other than what I can read about on the internet.

The first one I saw was laying in the middle of the gravel road and my first thought was that it was a very very strange mushroom...when I walked over to it I looked over and saw the thorny tree that was absolutely ancient and loaded with the fruits and thorns.

 

Anyone know any magical uses for it?  Apparently it's also called a "bodark" tree...a corruption of bois d'arc...French for bow-wood.  Native Americans in the Red River basin used it for making bows and other tools.  I figure if anything it may have some magical attributes because of this.  I'm fascinated enough by this thorny tree that I may actually try to plant some on the property here for use in the not so distant future.


"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#31 Horne

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 07:52 PM

That Osage orange looks absolutely amazing, Capsicum! Being European I can't tell you anything about it because I haven't ever seen it before. Awesome find though, looks like some alien brains or something.


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#32 Caps

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 07:55 PM

That Osage orange looks absolutely amazing, Capsicum! Being European I can't tell you anything about it because I haven't ever seen it before. Awesome find though, looks like some alien brains or something.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Haha I guess I'm lucky it wasn't some sort of alien egg pod or something!  They are edible but aren't commonly eaten because they taste bad.  Apparently they're cultivated for their wood in parts of Eastern Europe.


"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#33 Horne

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 08:02 PM

I'll ask an online friend of mine about the orange. She works in Osage County and she loves the area, so she might be familiar with it.


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#34 Guest_monsnoleedra_*

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 08:15 PM

We have three of those tree's on our property and a couple more in the fields beyond it.  Discovered them when we bought the house as the fruit was laying all around the tree's.  Thorns all over the tree but the fruit looks like a citric fruit on the inside.  Don't know much about them though as far as magical though it seems they were used for bows and arrows.


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#35 uncertainfuture

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:10 AM

Uncertainfuture, this is a wonderful time to study wildcrafting. I recommend Green Dean's site as a starting place because it is so comprehensive, but there are so many excellent sources of information all around.

Thanks for the info!


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#36 Caps

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 09:32 PM

wanted to bump this thread

 

funny that it doesn't do me any good now that I live on the other side of the continent...although sometimes it may not be the same species but a related plant that grows in similar conditions.  I'm having to relearn local flora all over again


"It is the still and silent sea that drowns a man." - Old Norse proverb

"It is better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war."

#37 RapunzelGnome

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 09:46 PM

We have a ton of those Osage orange trees on the property at my job. We call em "hedge-apples" around here because the thorny trees are perfect for hedging farms and fields. I use the thorns in spellwork and craft projects occasionally (they are HUGE)...not sure about the hedge apples themselves. I bet they'd be good in protection/boundary work.

People hate them at my job. The apples fall and rot and smell so the landscapers complain about having to pick them up by hand. A couple of times they have fallen on people's cars from high up on the tree and broken windshields or dented the body.

But I love the trees, old and dark and snarly and thorn covered. If I could find a practical use for the hedgesapples, I'd harvest them myself and save myself from hearing their complaints. I wonder if they would make dye or something..

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#38 Christine

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 12:12 AM

Osage orange fruits are a traditional anti-spider charm. I tried it, but mine rotted and I had to throw it out. I should have stuck it on the radiator.


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#39 Ravenshaw

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 03:32 AM

Christine - cutting them into thin slices helps dry them out, too, and makes the fragrance spread more throughout the house. Seems to work for spiders! I like spiders in my home, but not my in BEDROOM! Worst alarm clock ever


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#40 Ravenshaw

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Posted 12 February 2016 - 03:33 AM

Also, where I come from, we call Osage orange "monkey balls" ;)


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