Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Making your own (cheap) runes


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Wexler

Wexler

    Something wrong? Blame retrograde

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,109 posts

Posted 18 July 2014 - 03:55 PM

I know there is a very traditional and proper way to make a set of runes (I am recalling something about a female tree before the first bloom, blooding, et cetera).

 

I want to explore working with runes, and I think for this I will need a basic set. I would rather make some than buy some, but I do not think I want to go through the trouble of making a really nice and genuine set if I can never work with them. Plus, I would hate to make a great tool that just sits collecting dust, seeing as I would likely not feel comfortable giving away a set of blooded runes cut from a family tree.

 

For those of you that know the runes well, would I still get a good feel for them if I made a set out of a dowel rod or clay? Are there parts of the traditional process that really must be followed to get a decent set?


  • 0

'Sir,' I said to the universe, 'I exist.'

'That,' said the universe, 'creates no sense of obligation in me whatsoever.'

 

[avatar source]


#2 Mountain Witch

Mountain Witch

    Practical b/witch

  • Moderators
  • 3,826 posts

Posted 18 July 2014 - 04:29 PM

Wex,

 

It all depends on you. As I said in chat last night, I bought my first set and it was as cheap as I could find. (It was one of those Ralph Blume sets. I kept the blank rune in case I accidentally lost one, discarded the book & after some 'net reading, starting learning on my own.) At that point I didn't know if runes were something I'd connect to and didn't want to spend a lot of time, money or effort.

 

Once I decided that yes, I could work with them, I made a set from a wood stick picked up off our property. (Can't remember which type of wood.) Before I went to the trouble of blooding them I cast them a few times. Although I got an accurate reading, they didn't feel right. You see, the cheap set I bought was ceramic and the wood felt too lightweight in my hands. I think I still have them stashed in a drawer somewhere...

 

So, I decided I needed something heavier. but I'm not very artistic & thought if I made my own clay/ceramic ones that they'd look like crap. (The wood ones are rather cheesy-looking, IMO.)  I spent a boatload of money on blue lace agate cabochons I found at a gem & mineral show. I knew as I was carving them that they'd be perfect for me & they are. The weight is just right, they're small enough that I can hold all 24 in my tiny hands before casting, and besides, they're just pretty. (Blue's my favorite color.)  The carving is amateur-looking but they work, so...

 

If you want to try them, go ahead & buy a cheap set. Naturally, cleanse them first. Then see if they work for you. If you & runes get along, then decide what material works well for you & make your own set. It's time- and energy-consuming so if you & runes don't mesh, why expend it?


For purposes of action nothing is more useful than narrowness of thought combined with energy of will.
~ Henri Frederic Amiel

You can access my blog and get autographed copies of my books through my website


#3 Wexler

Wexler

    Something wrong? Blame retrograde

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,109 posts

Posted 18 July 2014 - 06:13 PM

Thank you very much MW, your set sounds lovely! To be honest I never even considered a set made from stone.

 

If all that is really necessary is a physical representation of the rune, I think I will go ahead and make my own little set. I was just worried there may still need to be some special aspect that had to be involved for a set to work.


  • 0

'Sir,' I said to the universe, 'I exist.'

'That,' said the universe, 'creates no sense of obligation in me whatsoever.'

 

[avatar source]


#4 Mountain Witch

Mountain Witch

    Practical b/witch

  • Moderators
  • 3,826 posts

Posted 18 July 2014 - 06:35 PM

 

I was just worried there may still need to be some special aspect that had to be involved for a set to work.

 

There may be those who feel all sorts of special things (type of wood or other material, time of day/month/year harvested, etc.) are required to make a set. I don't buy that - I know professional readers who do very well with a purchased set.


For purposes of action nothing is more useful than narrowness of thought combined with energy of will.
~ Henri Frederic Amiel

You can access my blog and get autographed copies of my books through my website