Jump to content

The Witchy Cabinet


Nikki

Recommended Posts

For the new Witch, starting out can be a daunting and costly venture. Most of us have an array of kitchen spices, a knife, and few candles laying around. That’s great, but then what? It can take years to acquire all the ‘tricks of the trade’ – let alone a scads of herbs, oils, incense and books, and books, and books, and more books.

 

Here’s a few TW Topics and threads that can help you save both time and money:

 

*WhiteRose's IconicTopic: Practicality,Tricks and Tips. A wonderfully crafty thread. 

*TW’s BOOK and Music Reviews

*Shoppes: This section lists many online occult shops to browse, some of which of have been validated by fellow members for both customer service and the quality products.

 

 

In the Divination Section instead of purchasing a Black Mirror, I learned how to make one very inexpensively and how to infuse it with my own essence in the Magic Mirror thread, saving me $$$ and giving me a much more powerful tool.

 

 

 

*Food and Drink Recipes

*Home Made and Herbal Remedies

These two Sections are invaluable to those on a budget and/or prefer not to ingest Over-The-Counter preparations. You’ll also see how many common herbs and spices are indeed magical.

 

There’s tons of amazing money saving, crafty advice to be had by one and all. 

 

    Here’s the prefect place to post all the great stuff found on TW to better stock our Witchy Cabinets.

Edited by Nikki
  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great topic!  I'm a ridiculously thrifty person (sometimes to a fault), and that approach to purchasing expanded to my witchy collecting as well.  I know a few of these were mentioned in the "Practicality" thread, but here's my personal experience:

Dollar stores and discount retailers are a fantastic source for inexpensive unscented candles.  I just picked up a bunch of decently-sized latched-lid glass jars at Michael's Arts and Crafts for $1 each, perfect for holding "ingredients".  Thrift shops (second-hand, used item stores) are a fantastic resource for cheap baubles and trinkets (incense burners, candlestick holders, bells, knives, photo frames for making scrying mirrors, empty office binders).  My local metaphysical bookstore is ridiculously overpriced on most things, but sell books at list prices and offer a wide selection of bulk herbs to be purchased in your specified quantity for cheaper than I can get online (and possibly at better quality, too).  Anything else I feel I need for workings, I make from materials I already have or can easily find, like the African porcupine quill given to me by an animal trainer at a safari-themed zoo that was converted into a lancet for drawing blood for certain spells.  Animal bones can easily be gotten for free or cheaply through harvesting roadkill, making friends with hunters (or hunting yourself), checking with a taxidermist, or poking around locally-owned craft/jewelry/bead supply stores.

One thing I can't really recall seeing mentioned is the option of bartering, either with witches or mundane folks.  I just traded some of my homemade Alaskan sea salt for some owl feathers with a Wiccan acquaintance in England, and today am hoping to trade a kayak for an enormous outdoor cast iron cauldron (presumably from a non-witch).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey AW -- Niice !!!  That's crafty !!!

 

Speaking of cast iron cauldrons, instead of buying a tiny, overpriced cauldron from occult dealers, I went Amazon and purchased a 1 quart, cast iron Dutch Oven that a boy scout or a camper might use... not only was it pre-seasoned, it came with a lid (oft sold separately) and will last 100 years -- all with free shipping, too.  It's THE prefect caldron.  Actually, the idea came to me while reading WhiteRose's Practicality Thread. 

 

Speaking of barter... I have two 1/2 ounces of Agrimony up for grabs...lol.  A Book Swap wouldn't suck either !!!

 

OH, instead of buying expensive, bulky books about local flora and fauna ... look for less expensive pocket-guides that are weather resistant, fit in a glove box and your pocket.  Don't laugh, but the children's section has got great pocket-guides with colorful renderings for easy identification. Very useful for the beginner !!!

 

Also, Military field guides are great, inexpensive resource, too. (lots of info about identifying poisonous plants)

Edited by Nikki
  • Upvote 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great topic.

 

I read the practicality thread you mentioned Nikki and it is amazing. I am city folk with no garden or yard to speak of so growing anything is practically impossible for me. There is a lovely wooded area near where I live which acts as a playground for the local kids and a shitbox for the local dog walkers so cultivating or collecting from here is out too.

 

When it comes to my supplies as it were, most of the things I've collected have been found or from charity shops. I love second hand shopping. I have found quite a few out of print books gathering dust at the back of charity shops.

 

I am always intrigued by the things people throw out and I wonder what back story an item I find has. I also find that when it comes to certain items, older is crafted better. I'd rather buy an old beat up oak chest from a charity shop than a brand new 'whatever' wood one from new.

 

To add to your post Nikki, I know there are a few phone apps which allow you to take a picture of a leaf, plant, tree and identify it that way. I've not used them myself but they might help someone in a pinch.

 

Pound shops/dollar stores are great for an assorment of things from plain notebooks to jars, candles, storage boxes.

I tend to stay away from any shop which specialises in 'occult' items as I usually find anything I need online cheaper.

 

I should have maybe made my user name skinflint or miser....I am so damn cheap!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Today at my local grocer I found two different named candles that were In fact the same. One called utility candles and one called emergency candles. In both cases the candles were white, 3/4" in diameter and 4" tall, and 10 to a box. Each box cost a dollar! I happened upon them in two different sections of the store.

 

The utility candles were on the isle were motor oil and small tools are sold, they were near the flashlights.

 

The emergency candles were on the isle were charcoal, lighter fluid, canning supplies, and matches are sold.

 

Neither box jumped out at me, in both cases I was looking for something else and stumbled upon them sort of out of sight.

 

Try looking at your grocer, it's worth the try.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Today at my local grocer I found two different named candles that were In fact the same. One called utility candles and one called emergency candles. In both cases the candles were white, 3/4" in diameter and 4" tall, and 10 to a box. Each box cost a dollar! I happened upon them in two different sections of the store.

 

The utility candles were on the isle were motor oil and small tools are sold, they were near the flashlights.

 

The emergency candles were on the isle were charcoal, lighter fluid, canning supplies, and matches are sold.

 

Neither box jumped out at me, in both cases I was looking for something else and stumbled upon them sort of out of sight.

 

Try looking at your grocer, it's worth the try.

 

 

There are a few herbs i can identify and find in my yard and in natural areas here and i collect a lot of stones and other natural bits while out on walks.  I mostly buy colored candles and herbs, oiled and other gemstones from local metaphysical shops but i also get a lot from the grocery store!  I get boxes of white candles and tea candles, spices, sea salt and some potted herbs and here the grocery stores have little sections for 'ethnic' foods. The Hispanic section is good for herbs, like whole bay leaves, flax seeds, etc and the tall white jar candles as well as a few candles of Saints for those who work with such things.  I also buy memorial candles, Shabat candlesticks and Kosher salt in the Kosher section.  I like to get organic garlic and local honey, pomegranates and and other fruits to use as offerings.  Oh, and almond oils, olive oils, etc. for other ritual and magical uses.  So yeah, grocery stores can be good places!

 

I've also found some rather nice things in antique stores, like a statue of Artemis from Turkey, nice incense burners, etc..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're right Melusine grocery stores are good places. And thanks for reminding me, I forgot all about the Shabbat candles. I don't think about Kosher salt because I use it all the time for cooking so I guess I take it for granted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...