Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Satsuma Herb Infused Celtic Salt

salt herb herbalism

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Evelyne

Evelyne

    Member

  • Seekers
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts

Posted 23 January 2014 - 03:59 AM

I'm a cook/recipe developer by trade (among other things), and kitchen magic is in my blood. A favorite are these (delicious....) protective salts to give as gifts to loved ones. My favorite way to prepare this salt is with a crystal appropriate to the working on the center island along with an incense burning that is likewise appropriate. I sage my kitchen tools (I have a few designated for magical kitchen work as opposed to the day to day work grind), and then I get to it. I imbue this with hellah protection & health; this is a favorite winter solstice gift...nice for an upcoming new year. But great all winter while citrus is in season. Oh right...and it's good on and in *everything ever*.

 

Satsuma Herb Celtic Salt

1025 g celtic or other flaky sea salt

1.5 T chopped/ground lavender

2 T ground fennel seed

1/2 cup chopped rosemary

1/2 cup chopped sage

1/3 cup chopped thyme

juice and zest of 8-9 satsumas (orange, tangerines, etc can easily be substituted)

 

Directions:

Finely chop & grind your herbs. Add your herbs to the salt in a mixing bowl. Combine thoroughly with hands or a wooden spoon. Stir in juice. Spread salts on a parchment on two parchment or silpat lined baking sheets. Dry at your oven's lowest temp 3-4 hours, stirring every now and then until bone dry. Cool completely. Bottle & store in a cool, dark place. Makes an excellent addition to basically everything—fish, fowl, pork, and lamb especially. Beef too, though. I use it in place of normal salt pretty regularly—soups, dressings, sauces, you name it. Also great to add a dash to sweet dishes for that bright little salty edge that makes desserts light up. Try brownies or chocolate cookies with a pinch of it. Oh man. (also, feel free to cut the recipe in half, this is the batch size I make around the holidays for lots of people)

 


  • 2

#2 Whiterose

Whiterose

    Senior Member

  • Former Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,747 posts

Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:05 AM

I make a shake and bake that is similar. I change the recipe every time I make it. Mine always tastes better than hubs because of that hellah awesomeness I throw in.  ;)  


  • 0

#3 Evelyne

Evelyne

    Member

  • Seekers
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts

Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:28 AM

I make a shake and bake that is similar. I change the recipe every time I make it. Mine always tastes better than hubs because of that hellah awesomeness I throw in.   :wink:

 

 

Infused salts are my jam! I make one with Sriracha and lime that kicks the shit out of anything (mostly culinarily speaking, but metaphysically too, if one wanted, I suppose)  :happy: 


  • 0

#4 CelticGypsy

CelticGypsy

    Crazy NastyAss Honey Badger

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,105 posts

Posted 23 January 2014 - 12:39 PM

Oh this sounds like something I would give a go too. Thanks for your input on it as well, WhiteRose.

 

Sounds yummy Evelyn. :)

 

 

Regards,

Gypsy


  • 0

" The last thing you wanted a Witch to do is get bored and start making her own amusements, because Witches sometimes have erratically famous ideas about what was amusing "

 

Terry Pratchett Legends 1 


#5 ArcticWitch

ArcticWitch

    Senior Member

  • Former Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 708 posts

Posted 24 January 2014 - 08:04 PM

Lovely idea, Evelyne! I'm heading to the beach this afternoon to harvest seawater for my first attempt at making salt. I've been finding interesting flavoring recipes here and there, but none sound as awesome as your satsuma idea!
  • 0

#6 LdyShalott

LdyShalott

    NecRomancer

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 850 posts

Posted 24 January 2014 - 08:15 PM

I am a huge fan of flavored salts, some favs are a chipolte, lime and cilantro salt, rosemary and porcini salt and citrus rosemary thyme..


  • 0

Most witches don’t believe in gods. They know that the gods exist, of course. They even deal with them occasionally. But they don’t believe in them. They know them too well. It would be like believing in the postman.  T.P.

In order to understand the living.. you have to commune with the dead..
You are a tiny little soul carrying around a corpse.-- Epictetus
All experience is an arch wherethrough gleams that untravelled world whose margin fades for ever and for ever when I move.

 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: salt, herb, herbalism