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Herbs for depression and to aid in memory


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#1 Sarafina

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 02:24 AM

Wondering if you great herbalist know of a mixture to make to help with depression and one to help one with their memory?

 

I have fought with depression for a long time and I don't like the idea of taking medication for it. I am scared of getting addicted to it. I much rather take something natural. Also, as part of changing myself I am planning on going back to school. I always wanted to go to college, but I have a very hard time with learning. I believe that I have always had a learning disability along with ADD. So I don't learn the same way as everyone else. I am not sure if some herbs will help my memory.

 

So any help on what I can use to aid in improving my memory, help with learning/ADD, and depression would be great.



#2 Davenport

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 02:38 AM

B-vitamins,excercise, St Johns wort and sunshine just to name a few things that help.


Edited by Davenport, 03 November 2013 - 02:39 AM.


#3 Jevne

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 02:41 AM

Have you been officially diagnosed with clinical depression and/or ADHD or equivalent?  If so, take the medication prescribed to you by your primary care physician or psychiatrist.  Work with them to ensure you are receiving the proper dosage.  Supplement with herbal remedies, as others will soon suggest to you.  Just make sure there are not any adverse interactions likely from mixing your primary medications with herbal supplements.  Anyone who is a "great herbalist" should be able to recommend herbs that will mix well with other items. 

 

(Slipping my psychologist hat back off . . . )



#4 Michele

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:31 PM

Lol @ Jevne's hat... for me (and assuming like Jevne said you are under a physician's care and not a danger to yourself), I would avoid graveyards and the dead and and all the gothic and morbid things that people love this time of year, and I would use a lot of light. If you are into runes there are runes associated with memory  and also runes which are used to fight darkness (which depression would be considered  a form of darkness). I live in light - tons of windows, always greet the light which comes in them, keep curtains open (especially in my bedroom so I wake up each morning to the sunrise, which is itself symbolic of hope, new beginnings, new chances, etc.). And I don't watch depressing shit on TV, lol.  I find that many people feed their depression, not realizing they are doing so. Be active - achieve something. Clean the house, paint the wall. Feel productive and you'll be productive. Get your house in order and your life will follow. 

 

M

 

P.S. Rosemary is good for remembering (this has just come up elsewhere, lol)...


Edited by Michele, 03 November 2013 - 12:34 PM.


#5 Whiterose

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 03:16 PM

Lol @ Jevne's hat... for me (and assuming like Jevne said you are under a physician's care and not a danger to yourself), I would avoid graveyards and the dead and and all the gothic and morbid things that people love this time of year, and I would use a lot of light. If you are into runes there are runes associated with memory  and also runes which are used to fight darkness (which depression would be considered  a form of darkness). I live in light - tons of windows, always greet the light which comes in them, keep curtains open (especially in my bedroom so I wake up each morning to the sunrise, which is itself symbolic of hope, new beginnings, new chances, etc.). And I don't watch depressing shit on TV, lol.  I find that many people feed their depression, not realizing they are doing so. Be active - achieve something. Clean the house, paint the wall. Feel productive and you'll be productive. Get your house in order and your life will follow. 

 

M

 

P.S. Rosemary is good for remembering (this has just come up elsewhere, lol)...

 

 

This is really good.  There are alot of people that come on here asking for herbs and what not for depression and with out changing the things that are wrong in your life, its not likely to work long term.  I can not comment on the medical side, but changing your routine helps alot too.  If you're in a rut, do something different and get out of it.  Do some introspection and find out why you may be doing the same things that are harmful to your well being and change them. Use magic to give you more energy or motivation.  Make an effort to as Michelle said, bring more light in to the home.  I also find that throwing open a window helps move the air and energy about to help with stagnant energy that may be affecting my mood. Move furniture around, get rid of clutter. Go live.   Do things that you like to do and if you don't feel like doing them because you are in your mental hole, force yourself until you start to feel happy.   Bottom line is that herbs will only help short term.  If you have a real problem with depression you need to make some long term changes in your environment and in your thinking patterns. 

 

On the memory side,being depressed takes a ton of energy and takes a toll on the whole body. Once that burden of depression is lifted you will have more energy and your memory will likely improve.  If not, try eating healthier to get the nutrients your body needs to support good memory.  


Edited by Whiterose, 03 November 2013 - 03:20 PM.


#6 Wyrd

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 06:47 PM

Niacin (B-3) feature is its ability to greatly reduce Anxiety and Depression. That said depression can be complex so I recommend that you read this book;

 

THE VITAMIN CURE FOR DEPRESSION by Bo Jonsson, M.D., Ph.D., and Andrew W. Saul

ISBN-10: 1591202825
ISBN-13: 978-1591202820

 

 

Niacin is vitamin B-3, one of the water soluble B-complex vitamins. One of niacin's unique properties is its ability to help you naturally relax and get to sleep more rapidly at night. And it is well established that niacin helps reduce harmful cholesterol levels in the bloodstream. Abram Hoffer, M.D., Ph.D. explains: "Niacin is one of the best substances for elevating high density lipoprotein cholesterol (the "good cholesterol) and so decreases the ratio of the total cholesterol over high density cholesterol."

Another niacin feature is its ability to greatly reduce anxiety and depression. Yet another feature of niacin is that it dilates blood vessels and creates a sensation of warmth, called a "niacin flush." This is often accompanied with a blushing of the skin. It is this "flush" or sensation of heat that indicates a temporary saturation of niacin, and that is our topic here.

When you flush, you can literally see and feel that you've taken enough niacin. The idea is to initially take just enough niacin to have a slight flush. This means a pinkness about the cheeks, ears, neck, forearms and perhaps elsewhere. A slight niacin flush should end in about ten minutes or so. If you take too much niacin, the flush may be more pronounced and longer lasting. If you flush beet red for half an hour and feel weird, well, you took too much. And large doses of niacin on an empty stomach is certain to cause profound flushing.

Dr. Hoffer writes: "With larger initial doses, the flush is more pronounced and lasts longer," says Dr. Hoffer. "But with each additional dose, the intensity of the flush decreases and in most patients becomes a minor nuisance rather than an irritant. Niacin should always be taken immediately after finishing ones meal."

I have found that the best way for me to accurately control the flushing sensation is to start with very small amounts of niacin and gradually increase until the first flush is noticed. One method is to start with a mere 25 milligrams (25 mg) three times a day, say with each meal. The next day, try 50 mg at breakfast, 25 mg at lunch and 25 mg at supper. The following day, one might try 50 mg at breakfast, 50 mg at lunch, and 25 mg at supper. And, the next day, 50 mg at each of the three meals. The next day, 75 mg, 50 mg and 50 mg. Then, 75. 75 and 50, and so on. In this way you have increased at the easy rate of only 25 mg per day. One would continue to increase the dosage by 25 mg per day until the flush occurs.

It is difficult to predict a saturation level for niacin because each person is different. As a general rule, the more you hold, the more you need. If you flush early, you don't need much niacin. If flushing doesn't happen until a high level, then your body is obviously using the higher amount of the vitamin.

Now that you've had your first flush, what next? Since a flush indicates saturation of niacin, it is desirable to continue to repeat the flushing, just very slightly, to continue the saturation. This could be done three or more times a day. To get to sleep sooner at night, niacin can be taken to saturation at bedtime, too. You might be asleep before you even notice the flush.

An important point here is that niacin is a vitamin, not a drug. It is not habit forming. Niacin does not require a prescription because it is that safe. It is a nutrient that everyone needs each day. Different people in different circumstances require different amounts of niacin.

Says Dr. Hoffer: "A person's "upper limit is that amount which causes nausea, and, if not reduced, vomiting. The dose should never be allowed to remain at this upper limit. The usual dose range is 3,000 to 9,000 milligrams daily divided into three doses, but occasionally some patients may need more. The toxic dose for dogs is about 5,000 milligrams per 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) body weight. We do not know the toxic dose for humans since niacin has never killed anyone."

Inevitable physician skepticism and questions about niacin's proven safety and effectiveness are best answered in Orthomolecular Psychiatry, edited by David Hawkins, M.D. and Linus Pauling, Ph.D. This nearly 700 page textbook is the standard reference for details on niacin therapy. Persons with a history of heavy alcohol use, liver disorders, diabetes, or pregnancy will especially want to have their physician monitor their use of niacin in quantity. Monitoring long-term use of niacin is a good idea for anyone. It consists of having your doctor check your liver function with a simple blood test.

Plain and simple niacin may be purchased in tablets at any pharmacy or health food store. Tablets typically are available in 50 mg, 100 mg, or 250 mg dosages. The tablets are usually scored down the middle so you can break them in half easily. You can break the halves in half, too, to get the exact amount you want.

If a niacin tablet is taken on an empty stomach, a flush will occur (if it is going to occur at all) within about 20 minutes. If niacin is taken right after a meal, a flush may be delayed. In fact, the flush may occur long enough afterwards that you forgot that you took the niacin! Don't let the flush surprise you. Remember that niacin does that, and you can monitor it easily.

If you want a flush right away, you can powder the niacin tablet. This is easily done by crushing it between two spoons. Powdered niacin on an empty stomach can result in a flush within minutes. Sustained release niacin is often advertised as not causing a flush at all. This claim may not be completely true; sometimes the flush is just postponed. It would probably be difficult to determine your saturation level with a sustained- or time-released product. They are also more costly. But the biggest reason to avoid sustained-release niacin is that most reports of side effects stem from use of that form.

There is nothing wrong with niacinAMIDE, by the way. That form of vitamin B-3 is frequently found in multiple vitamins and B-complex preparations. Niacinamide does not cause a flush at all. In my opinion, it is less effective in inducing relaxation and calming effects. Niacinamide also does not lower serum cholesterol. This is an important distinction to make when purchasing.

It is a good idea to take all the other B-complex vitamins in a separate supplement in addition to the niacin. The B-vitamins, like professional baseball players, work best as a team. Still, the body seems to need proportionally more niacin than the other B vitamins. Even the U.S. Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for niacin is much more than for any other B-vitamin. Many physicians consider the current RDA for niacin of only 20 mg to be way too low for optimum health. While the government continues to discuss this, it is possible to decide for yourself based on the success of doctors that use niacin for their patients every day.

 

:)


Wyrd
The mind is like a parachute, it only works when It's open

#7 Aurelian

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 09:10 AM

Hmmm.  You could try ashwagandha, bacopa, 5-ht, and oats.  Any mixture, and see what works.


"The truth about the world, he said, is that anything is possible. Had you not seen it from birth and thereby bled it of its strangeness it would appear to you for what it is, a hat trick in a medicine show, a fevered dream, a trance bepopulate with chimeras having neither analogue nor precedent, an itinerant carnival, a migratory tentshow whose ultimate destination after many a pitch in many a mudded field is unspeakable and calamitous beyond reckoning."  - Cormac McCarthy


#8 Evergreen47

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 07:15 PM

 Get your house in order and your life will follow. 

 

M

 

 

This is the piece of advice that most resonates with me. I think we underestimate just how much effect our surroundings have on our lives and well-being. I know I'm a crazy cleaning-fanatic, but housecleaning is some of the best sympathetic magic for mood and stability that I know of. 


I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

-=Frank Herbert=-

 

Rock on, gold dust woman. Take your silver spoon and dig your grave.


#9 Lynn

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 02:38 PM

Exercise---get your heart rate UP and maintained for a decent amount of time at LEAST a few times per week, but if you only do it once, so what? Better than nothing. (Check with Dr, depends on your weight, how active you are already), be certain to get enough sun on your skin; if not take a vit D supp.   Folic acid and Fish oil have been now shown to help people as well. Avoid fake sugars(NO fake sugar would be BEST), avoid white sugar(its okay to have some :smile: ), GET ENOUGH SLEEP.  Watch, read things that make you laugh. Laughter does things to your body that helps fight depression.

 

Medications for depression addictive? Highly unlikely. I'm not a Dr though.  Seriously, they're a pain in the patookus, can't imagine getting addicted to them, its not like getting a high, BUT if they ease your depression, what are you waiting for????   Did you know that having a hard time setting up an appointment and going to a Dr is actually a *symptom* of depression? I ended up having my husband make my first appointment for me because I literally COULD NOT do it.

 

St Johns wort did diddlysquat for me, but it may help you.  Depends on each individual. Maintaining one's depression is VERY individual.  A combo of first the basics (The sleep and exercise and eat healthy more veggies and fruit), then figuring out  the meds, the herbs and have you considered talk therapy? That is something that has helped tons of people as well. :smile:  But the hard part is having the focus and energy to actually figure out what works for you, a bit of this,maybe none of that.  Do you have a friend you trust whom could help you do so?

 

Anyway, gtg. Saw this post and wanted to put in my experienced two-cents. :wink:

 

Depression is annoying, isn't it?

 

Take care cya

 

PS Oops!! Importamt point!  Herbs ARE medication!!!!!!  Just because they are "natural" dosen't mean they ain't.  K. bye. :)


Edited by Lynn, 06 November 2013 - 02:57 PM.

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"Women and cats will do as they please, men and dogs need to relax and get used to the idea." Robert Heinlein

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#10 Lynn

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 02:42 PM

This is the piece of advice that most resonates with me. I think we underestimate just how much effect our surroundings have on our lives and well-being. I know I'm a crazy cleaning-fanatic, but housecleaning is some of the best sympathetic magic for mood and stability that I know of. 

 

I wanted to support this notion as well.  Dust and tidying up HELPS.  Your surroundings have a strong effect on your mood.  Just making your bed can help. :) Open the window if you are able and there is fresh air not car fumes waiting to ccome into your living space. 


'When in danger, when in doubt, Run in circles, scream and shout" Robert Heinlein.
"Women and cats will do as they please, men and dogs need to relax and get used to the idea." Robert Heinlein

"In Wildness is the preservation of the World." Henry David Thoreau


#11 Lynn

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 02:55 PM

This is really good.  There are alot of people that come on here asking for herbs and what not for depression and with out changing the things that are wrong in your life, its not likely to work long term.  I can not comment on the medical side, but changing your routine helps alot too.  If you're in a rut, do something different and get out of it.  Do some introspection and find out why you may be doing the same things that are harmful to your well being and change them. Use magic to give you more energy or motivation.  Make an effort to as Michelle said, bring more light in to the home.  I also find that throwing open a window helps move the air and energy about to help with stagnant energy that may be affecting my mood. Move furniture around, get rid of clutter. Go live.   Do things that you like to do and if you don't feel like doing them because you are in your mental hole, force yourself until you start to feel happy.   Bottom line is that herbs will only help short term.  If you have a real problem with depression you need to make some long term changes in your environment and in your thinking patterns. 

 

On the memory side,being depressed takes a ton of energy and takes a toll on the whole body. Once that burden of depression is lifted you will have more energy and your memory will likely improve.  If not, try eating healthier to get the nutrients your body needs to support good memory.  

 

 

I think some of this advice is in danger of the old thinking  of "Pull yourself up by your own bootstraps", which if it is anything but a very mild, not lasting depression, will not work and leaves the person feeling somehow it's their "fault" for not doing "enough", when in reality part of depression is NOT be able to DO the things you love, not only because you don't have the energy, and at times your body literally hurts, but also because you find no pleasure in activities that once gave you pleasure.  Just going out and doing them anyway will not suddenly make you happy and enjoy them once again, it doesn't work that way.  Sometimes it is the worst thing you can do,because it leaves you thinking, "What is wrong with me? I ought to be enjoying this and I am not." And it makes you worse.  Depression is a glitch, a physical, biological glitch in the brain.  You just don't tell a person with a broken leg to go run, because you enjoy it.


'When in danger, when in doubt, Run in circles, scream and shout" Robert Heinlein.
"Women and cats will do as they please, men and dogs need to relax and get used to the idea." Robert Heinlein

"In Wildness is the preservation of the World." Henry David Thoreau


#12 Whiterose

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 04:23 PM

I think some of this advice is in danger of the old thinking  of "Pull yourself up by your own bootstraps", which if it is anything but a very mild, not lasting depression, will not work and leaves the person feeling somehow it's their "fault" for not doing "enough", when in reality part of depression is NOT be able to DO the things you love, not only because you don't have the energy, and at times your body literally hurts, but also because you find no pleasure in activities that once gave you pleasure.  Just going out and doing them anyway will not suddenly make you happy and enjoy them once again, it doesn't work that way.  Sometimes it is the worst thing you can do,because it leaves you thinking, "What is wrong with me? I ought to be enjoying this and I am not." And it makes you worse.  Depression is a glitch, a physical, biological glitch in the brain.  You just don't tell a person with a broken leg to go run, because you enjoy it.

 

 

 

I think this is just a wee bit wrong.  One of the things that helps is to encourage activity in the person. Another thing that helps is to empower the person with the idea that they have control of their own life and their own feelings and minimize the victim mental state. Why do think so many depressed people are drawn to the craft? Because they want control over a situation they feel helpless in.  I am by no mean trivializing depression and think your response is a little inflammatory. I do know this is a hot button issue for you so that's possibly why the hackles are up and why I wont take it personally.  So...here are some experts and regular people that say the same thing.  

 

 

 

Supporting the depression treatment process

One of the most important things you can do to help a friend or relative with depression is to give your unconditional love and support throughout the treatment process. This involves being compassionate and patient, which is not always easy when dealing with the negativity, hostility, and moodiness that go hand in hand with depression.

  • Encourage activity. Invite your loved one to join you in uplifting activities, like going to a funny movie or having dinner at a favorite restaurant. Exercise is especially helpful, so try to get your depressed loved one moving. Going on walks together is one of the easiest options. Be gently and lovingly persistent—don’t get discouraged or stop asking.

 

http://www.helpguide...ssed_person.htm

 

 

To get better, you need to take an active role in your treatment. You're not just a patient. You and your doctor have to work as a team.

Of course, you might not feel up to taking an active role in anything. You might have doubts that treatment will help. But push yourself. Depression can make you feel powerless. Taking charge of your treatment is one way to feel in control again.

 

 

 

  • Make lifestyle changes. There's a lot you can do on your own to supplement your treatment. Eat healthy foods, high in fruits and vegetables and low in sugars and fats. Avoid alcohol and illicit drugs, which can cause or worsen depression. Make sure to get a good night's sleep. Several studies show that physical activity can help with the symptoms of depression. Start slowly. Try taking walks around the neighborhood with a friend. Gradually, work up to exercising on most days of the week.
  • Be open to new ideas. Your therapist may have suggestions that sound strange. He or she may push you to do things that feel awkward or uncomfortable. But try to stay open. Give new approaches a try. You may find them more helpful than you expected.
  • Don't give up. You may feel hopeless right now. You may feel like you're never going to get better. But feeling that way is a symptom of your condition. If you give yourself some time and allow your treatment to take effect, you will feel better again.

 

http://www.webmd.com.../treatment-tips

 

 

 

5)   Pick up a paintbrush, a pencil, an activity you got joy from in the past and re-explore that.  Or, sign up for the thing you always wanted to try. There is a long history and link between depression and creativity. It’s a bright light of this condition, so utilize it to your best advantage.

 

http://www.diycoutur...ther-when-youre

 

To Sarafina,

 

Medication is standardized and is proven to be more effective than the herbs they are derived from for certain things.  I wouldn't ignore that.  Medication is not evil. Herbs can help, but if this has been life long, I wouldn't experiment with herbs. 

 

Bottom line is you are in control. Take your control back, while taking meds and making other changes in your life like environmental and food changes that everyone mentioned.  All of it works together, there is no end all be all cure, its a process that takes time. If you have someone you can talk to in real life that is a good listener and is patient I would give them a call. Someone that makes you laugh and you love being around. Start to build your support system. Take each day one step at a time. The first step is getting out of bed in the morning.  If you can do that, make another goal to accomplish like going out to run a small errand or take a walk in the park.  Make little goals that you can easily achieve and have friend with you so its easier to achieve. When you achieve one, reward yourself. That's how I get through my days, hope this helps.   :smile:  *Hugs


Edited by Whiterose, 06 November 2013 - 04:24 PM.


#13 Aurelia

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 05:46 PM

I'm not a herbalist, but I've actually been researching several things recently to improve brain activity and longevity and they could help with your memory issue too.  I don't have medical training, so you should check that none of these things will have adverse reactions with your medication, etc.

 

Blueberries: they are amazing little things (even though I can't stand the taste lol), they're really good to help boost brain power, as well as containing antioxidants.  My research seemed to point to including 1 cup of blueberries to your diet per day, which honestly would make me gag because raw blueberries to me = bleh lol! But they don't have to be eaten whole, I've been including them in smoothies, adding some to yogurt (and mashing them up a bit) with honey, etc.

 

Nuts & Seeds: for the vitamin content it's good to include some nuts and seeds in your diet each day. You don't need very many, and they will also help with brain function. I have about a teaspoon of sunflower seeds (raw, not roasted or salted!), and about 4 walnut halves (sometimes more, because yum!) every day, and if I can find them I'll have 2 brazil nuts every few days (they're great, but you shouldn't have too many of them).

 

Omega-3 Fatty Acid: This is really essential for brain power, and you can find it in oily fish like salmon, sardines or herring (to name a few).  Omega-3 fatty acid also has been found to decrease the risk of brain decline and dementia later in life.

 

I hope those few things are of some help for the memory issue :)



#14 Mountain Witch

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 06:02 PM



PS Oops!! Importamt point!  Herbs ARE medication!!!!!!  Just because they are "natural" dosen't mean they ain't.  K. bye. :smile:

 

^^THIS. Bothers me a lot when people make the assumption herbs aren't drugs.  "Drugs" are simply synthetic, rather than natural chemicals. Herbs can and will interact with each other and synthetic medications. As long as you are on synthetic drugs, don't try to self-medicate to treat anything else without doing research to ensure there will be no adverse interactions. And always advise your doctor of everything you're taking so he/she can also ensure no adverse interactions when/if a new synthetic drug is prescribed.

 

First, DO NOT go off any medication without speaking with your doctor. If you've been on prescriptions for any length of time, cutting yourself off cold-turkey can have major side effects. Second, DO NOT take St. John's Wort while you're on any anti-depressant. SJW can potentiate (increase) the effects with, again, major side effects.

 

As with treating any chronic condition, lifestyle & diet are a major part of treating clinical depression.  All the advice given above is good. You may find once you get a handle on the depression that some of your other issues may lessen or go away completely. Inability to concentrate is a symptom of depression.


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#15 Lynn

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 07:12 PM

I think this is just a wee bit wrong.  One of the things that helps is to encourage activity in the person. Another thing that helps is to empower the person with the idea that they have control of their own life and their own feelings and minimize the victim mental state. Why do think so many depressed people are drawn to the craft? Because they want control over a situation they feel helpless in.  I am by no mean trivializing depression and think your response is a little inflammatory. I do know this is a hot button issue for you so that's possibly why the hackles are up and why I wont take it personally.  So...here are some experts and regular people that say the same thing.  

 

 

http://www.helpguide...ssed_person.htm

 

 

 

http://www.webmd.com.../treatment-tips

 

 

http://www.diycoutur...ther-when-youre

 

To Sarafina,

 

Medication is standardized and is proven to be more effective than the herbs they are derived from for certain things.  I wouldn't ignore that.  Medication is not evil. Herbs can help, but if this has been life long, I wouldn't experiment with herbs. 

 

Bottom line is you are in control. Take your control back, while taking meds and making other changes in your life like environmental and food changes that everyone mentioned.  All of it works together, there is no end all be all cure, its a process that takes time. If you have someone you can talk to in real life that is a good listener and is patient I would give them a call. Someone that makes you laugh and you love being around. Start to build your support system. Take each day one step at a time. The first step is getting out of bed in the morning.  If you can do that, make another goal to accomplish like going out to run a small errand or take a walk in the park.  Make little goals that you can easily achieve and have friend with you so its easier to achieve. When you achieve one, reward yourself. That's how I get through my days, hope this helps.   :smile:  *Hugs

 

Sorry WR;I wasn't trying to be inflammatory. :smile:  My hackles were firmly in place, ie down. Honest!

 

Also I did indicate that it was some of the advice you wrote that gave me that impression, not all of it.  If you'll note, some of my advice was get up and get physically active too. I think it is a balance because I quiye agree that being proactive can make a person feel a whole lot better and more in charge.  Even making a list with one item on it under "How I can hlep myself feel better", can do loads of good.  But feeling bad about yourself because you can't enjoy something you feel you should be enjoy doing is detrimental.  I think one of the key words is "encouraging" someone to join it or go somewhere, not insisting, and  respecting their choice if they say no way.

What I meant was---well to give an ancedote to illustrate I recall once when I was having a serious attack and my husband asked if I wanted to make an apple pie with him, something I enjoy doing when I am feeling normal.  He offered because he was trying to cheer me up. I remember barely acknowledging his offer and when he started to get things out to bake, I just sat there in a stupor of black as it were! I remained where I was and he did it by himself.  He got frustrated and annoyed with me for "Not even trying" when it was something I "Loved to do."  At that moment, no i wouldhave found no pleasure in it and it backfired basically.  (This was a long time ago, he understands about the whole thing now a lot more and so do I)  Or a few weeks back I was having a difficult time and the subject of me going out and doing photography came up as a way to feel better, but I was exhausted for one thing and I knew from past experience that if I tried, it would have the opposite effect, it would have been frustrating doing something that normally brings me a lot of joy and having it just fall flat would have been too much to deal with and would have made me worse not better!  Just as being around other people sometimes is VERY painful when I am dealing with it, but I have had enough experince now with how I react depending on how severe I am feeling, that other times I know it is a good thing to have company. :smile:

 

don't think one has control over the feelings that depression can cause to happen, BUT one has control over how to respond to them!  Its a skill I think to be able to recognise that one is having a depression attack and therefore these awful feelings are not what is truly real. That these feelings you are having is a twisting of what is real, they feel real, they hurt for real, but are not the way it really is.

 

Again I am not trying to be inflammatory at all.  I honestly think you're pretty awesome WR. :smile:  We just disagree sometimes. :smile:

 

 

Also I wanted to add that from what my Dr. has said, clinical depression is NOT curable, it is managed.  They still do not understand what causes it and it could very well be different for every person who suffers from it.


Edited by Lynn, 06 November 2013 - 07:18 PM.

'When in danger, when in doubt, Run in circles, scream and shout" Robert Heinlein.
"Women and cats will do as they please, men and dogs need to relax and get used to the idea." Robert Heinlein

"In Wildness is the preservation of the World." Henry David Thoreau


#16 Sarafina

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 08:58 PM

Thank you everyone for the advice and all.

 

I have not been diagnosed. For the longest time I did not want to admit to having depression. I don't know why I am this way, but I really hate taking any kind of medication, even Ibuprofen for a headache. I will go hours with a headache before I finally break down and take something. Like I said I don't know why I am like that, I just am. I have eaten healthy for a very long time. I remember my aunt saying one time when I was a teen how eating the skin on chicken was like eating pure fat. I can say it's not a pretty picture when you visualize eating pure fat and then it collecting and sticking to your bones. So since then I ate healthier. I love veggies and fruit. I do have to be careful as to which fruits/veggie I eat as I am a Type 1 diabetic as of Feb 2011. Which finding out you have diabetes on top of depression does not help, nor does suffering 3 miscarries because you had type 2 diabetes and did not know it, thanks to your jacka** Endocrinologist who did not do his damn job like he should have.

 

I am slowly changing my life because I am actually sick of the way it has been. I am also very tired of feeling negative and hate and angry all the time. My boyfriend used to make me very happy, loved, and wanted, but once we moved in for a short time with his mom and half brother, that all changed. He went from being my boyfriend to being a husband to his mother and a father to his brother. Since she moved out and we finally moved to the other side of town, he still has not changed much. Plus I was dealing with custody and divorce. It has been a very long and stressful road and I still have more to go. I feel like the world is against me most of the time and I am being shit on every where I turn. So no matter how much I try to get out and feel better it's as if something or someone pushes me back 3 steps for the one good I take.

 

I am not looking for a cure, I just want something to help a little. Yes I have talked to someone. Actually I would talk to my daughter's therapist a lot and he is the one who agreed with me when I said I think I suffer from depression, he is also the one who agreed with me that I probably have ADD and a learning disability. All my friends and family are back home in CT. It has been a long road with trying to get back there and I am still working on it. It is harder dealing with depression and everything else when you have no support system. My boyfriend says he is here for me, but when I need him, he is not there or he gets mad at me and has pushed me away. I have thought so many times about ending my life, but I don't because I think about my kids and I don't want any of them growing up without me for them. I want to be there for everything in their life, so they keep me alive ( even when they drive me crazy, lol).

 

I will talk to my Dr about depression and see what they think and recommend to take.

 

Again, Thank you everyone



#17 Jevne

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 09:16 PM

Thank you everyone for the advice and all. . . .

 

I will talk to my Dr about depression and see what they think and recommend to take.

 

Again, Thank you everyone

 

I am glad that you said this, Sarafini, as no one on this Forum, that I know of, is qualified to diagnose depression.  Given your other statements, you symptoms could be related to a myriad of other things, not necessarily related to a chemical imbalance.  Everyone here is speaking from their frame of reference and experiences, so while the advice is good, the application may be totally unsuitable for your situation.  Once you have spoken with your doctor, you can begin building a treatment plan that suits your needs.

 

Best Wishes

Jevne



#18 Lynn

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 10:20 PM

I am glad that you said this, Sarafini, as no one on this Forum, that I know of, is qualified to diagnose depression.  Given your other statements, you symptoms could be related to a myriad of other things, not necessarily related to a chemical imbalance.  Everyone here is speaking from their frame of reference and experiences, so while the advice is good, the application may be totally unsuitable for your situation.  Once you have spoken with your doctor, you can begin building a treatment plan that suits your needs.

 

Best Wishes

Jevne

 

 

Yes!! Like she says!!


'When in danger, when in doubt, Run in circles, scream and shout" Robert Heinlein.
"Women and cats will do as they please, men and dogs need to relax and get used to the idea." Robert Heinlein

"In Wildness is the preservation of the World." Henry David Thoreau


#19 Ceres

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 11:16 PM

Sarafina I'm new here and I know that trust is a great deal. But my studies where on health major and I will give you some scientific advice first.

Depression is tough and the thoughts that you shared with us is very importan. I'm obliged to ask you to see a psychologist immediately. Only a practitioner can help you with your problem and don 't see it as medication. You will have someone to share your thoughts with and who actually knows what excactly is good for you to hear as an answer.

When it comes for medication is totally accepted that you don't want to take drugs. I can suggest you Dr Bach Remedies but first you must be sure for your actual problem and if you can use them because of you other condition. Discuss it with your doctors and your pharmacist from where you can obtain the remedies. I would suggest a mix of olive and white chestnut but it's just a suggestion. Only a pharmacist who works with remedies and who will actually meat you in person knows what's better for you. Don't forgett cause it's important, FIRST you must have a permition from you doctors.

Last but not least I have a nice recipe for memory boost with rosemary, orange flowers and vervain (2 pinches of each for a cup of tea).



#20 Whiterose

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 01:19 AM

This is not to Sarafina or really about depression at all as I have already given my opinion on that and everything should be taken on a case by case basis. This is more on the general trend to avoid medical advice as that is seen as exclusively "doctors realm" versus trusting ones own abilities and knowledge.  I really do not care to be berated on my view so if that is your reaction to the following, kindly fuck off.   :smile:  

 

In general though, while having a doctor's opinion is beneficial at times, a doctor's opinion is not the end all be all of advice.  Sometimes (stress on the sometimes part) its better to listen to one's own body and be in tune with its rhythms and quirks or listen to an experienced person that has been through it especially a family member, than to have a doctor push drugs or services on you with only "test results" at hand. I've had experiences in the last couple of weeks of that nature.  Doctor's are NOT always right so don't discount the advice of trusted family and friends or your own common sense for that of a doctor. Chances are that those of your immediate family will have a more rounded knowledge of what is up with you than a doctor would because they are around you all the time, know your medical history and share genetic code with you and may have experienced the same thing. Some random doctor isn't going to know all that and their view is purely based on what their tests tell them. What is normal for you may be odd for someone else and what is odd for someone else may be perfectly normal for you. Unless your doctor has been with you for years since childhood, I doubt they are going to know that much about you. 

 

Obviously that is not the case with everyone and certain people really should see a doctor instead of messing around in occult business (insert mental illness thread here), but I have noticed a trend lately of people pushing others off to the doctors first thing and taking a hands off approach. That's all fine and good I guess but you would think that witches...those who claim to have some sort of pull over the universal tides of energy, could sort out their problems or at least have an idea of what is going on with themselves or others, you know because of the whole "knowing" thing.

 

 Maybe I'm just being jaded because of my experience where I knew what was up for months and the "tests" could find nothing.  Does one believe their own eyes, sense of touch, common sense and knowing,....or the god damned "tests"? I say fuck the tests.  If a witch is witch, they should trust in their own abilities and being and not discount them on the word of some over worked doctor, especially when their abilities are proven right time after time. 
 


Edited by Whiterose, 29 November 2013 - 01:27 AM.