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powdered egg shell question


RoseRed

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So, I powdered some egg shells last night.  I really thought that the powder would be white.  It's more of a pale lavender/lilac.  It's a pretty color but it's not white.

 

I don't know if this is normal.  I'm thinking that maybe it took some of the color from my mortar and pestle but that doesn't even really makes sense since it's a deep, rich earth brown soapstone.

 

Is the powder supposed to be white or is it normal for it to turn colors?  I have no idea - I've never done it before.

 

 

 

(and I really need to save up and get a bigger mortar and pestle - the little one is cute but not very practical)

 

 

 

 

 

{edited to add - I tried to edit the title to 'powdered egg shell color question' but I can't edit the title.}

 

 

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I do not know, RoseRed.  Did you search the Forum for threads about egg shells.  There are 2 -3 in the public area, I think.  Maybe, you will find the answer in one of those.

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I personally have never come across that. I do not really understand what would make it turn Lavender? I am thinking an outside source is to blame.

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Yeah, I read a bunch of posts on powdered egg shells and eggs in general and haven't really come across the color thing.

 

I did leave the membrane attached so that just might be it.  Some of the shells were cooked and some were just dried waiting to be powdered.

 

It's going on my ancestral shrine and the color is a paler version of the candles that are already on it.  I think that's really cool and it was the first thing I thought of when I started to powder them.  I just didn't know if it was 'normal' or not.

 

I think I'll remove the membrane from the next batch of shells and see if that makes a difference.

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I have no idea about the egg shells as I don't use them. 

 

On the mortar and pestle thing, I would scour different antique shops in your area.  I got a giant one for $10 bucks in my local antique shop that would have been nearly $50 due to it being all marble, had I bought it online or at a new age shop. 

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As far as grinding egg shells I've found the easiest way to make cascarilla powder is to use a coffee grinder. It's not as time consuming and it makes it a much finer powder.

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Hmm, just remembered I've got some white eggshell in one of my jacket pockets - not sure on the bird species but the shell was pure white. Been in my pocket for nearly a year now all crumbled to bits. The things up lol.

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Great idea on the coffee grinder.  Where, oh where, did I put it?

 

I'll have to keep an eye out when I hit the shops.

 

Thanx for the great ideas!

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Great idea on the coffee grinder.  Where, oh where, did I put it?

 

I'll have to keep an eye out when I hit the shops.

 

Thanx for the great ideas!

I have heard a food processor will be able to produce similar results to a coffee grinder. 

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No, just regular eggs from the store.  I live out in the country and the farm fresh eggs are unbelievably expensive.  The people that charge $4 a dozen are the same ones complaining that they have to throw them away because they can't sell them.  It makes no sense to me.

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I have had that happen I just figured it was the egg shell , I know what they eat can slightly affect the color maybe the chicken ate a bunch of June bugs ! Well that's my brilliant hypotheses anyway interesting question anyways.

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I've had that happen before. I powder egg shells a lot for in my garden and other uses, and I've had them turn yellow, pink, lavender, blue and even green once. I grew up raising chickens and different breeds and yield different colors, so does what they have been eating. My Faverolles chickens laid cream colored eggs and I would get the coolest colors sometimes.

 

Now that I don't have enough room for my own chickens, I get eggs from a local hen house. If you find a good hen house, they sell their eggs at or around store prices so they can get rid of them. It's the "organic free-range" hobby chicken keepers who over price their eggs. I used to sell my extra eggs for $1 a dozen just to be rid of them.

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I would love to find someone selling them that cheap.

 

The people out here are weird.  Maybe it's because I'm a damn yankee and I'm just not in the 'in' group.

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I currently get mine from a local hen house for $1.25 a dozen. It took me about two months to find such a reasonably priced one. I ended up finding her number on a bulletin at one of the local tack shops. You could try asking around at your local farm, feed and tack stores. I find that home raised chicken eggs work so much better in my crafting. That is one of the reasons I miss my chickens so much!

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I currently get mine from a local hen house for $1.25 a dozen. It took me about two months to find such a reasonably priced one. I ended up finding her number on a bulletin at one of the local tack shops. You could try asking around at your local farm, feed and tack stores. I find that home raised chicken eggs work so much better in my crafting. That is one of the reasons I miss my chickens so much!

I hate chickens they are winged rats, so I don't raise my own thankfully finding a supply of eggs and feathers isnt very difficult here at least. Most people who have chickens have way to many eggs and are usually willing to give them away if you have a container or sell them very cheap. I agree look at your local feed and seed store or ask the clerk usually they know who has to many eggs. Our feed store actually sells them for .79 a dozen and cheaper if you bring a carton I just use a little bucket.

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I hate chickens they are winged rats,

 

HAHHAAHHA.......... Honestly folks does it really matter if the shell is naturally tinted ?  There is a variety of ways to tint or not tint, with left over shells.

 

I've soaked mine in coffee and tea grounds to give them a warm rich brown color............. AND........ put them in hydrogen peroxide to lighten the color.  Why I think our

 

WhiteRose used turmeric to tint her soap, some other Peer here tints her eggs with turmeric also, if memory serves me right. :)

 

 

 

Regards,

Gypsy

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I was kinda thinking the same thing, CG.  What difference does it make?  If you want them tinted, color them.  If you don't, I have also read online, here, and in other sources that you can whiten them.  It occurred to me that, for some, the natural color may be of the utmost importance, though.  I do not personally feel the color impacts the outcome to a significant degree, but others may feel differently or may be performing a working that requires a specific color.

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 It occurred to me that, for some, the natural color may be of the utmost importance, though.  I do not personally feel the color impacts the outcome to a significant degree, but others may feel differently or may be performing a working that requires a specific color.

 

Yep !  If one finds a wild bird egg that has it's own color and that species only has that color, then I fully agree that the Natural Color may be of the utmost importance.

 

Of course other will feel differently.... dye/tint or color Sharpie the damn things for their color preference.  LoL !  :biggrin:  I try NOT to over analyze the simplicity of

 

the lowly chicken egg shell, I just use it when I see fit to use it, in my Path. 

 

 

Regards,

Gypsy

 

Edited to Add :  Regarding the wild bird egg :

 

I would also be inclined to believe that, that particular egg found with it's natural color to the species of bird that laid it, would tie into the

lore of the bird and that could be taken into consideration for the Witch as well.  jmo.

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There is a big different, IMO, between a wild bird egg, found in nature, and saved for a particular type of working, and a chicken egg that has been crushed.  Once again, probably depends on the working and its purposes. :)

 

For the record, I have Sharpie'd an egg as part of a hex.  I found it quite effective. LOL!

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Bloody good for cleaning my saucpans also. The chicken shells of course,definitely not the rooks or robins lol

They also clean garbage disposals! You just grind turn on your disposal and water then tossem in they clean the blades really well.

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No, it doesn't really matter.  I just didn't know if it was normal for ground shells to have a tint to them. 

 

I needed a sandy type base for a tea light candle holder and thought the powdered egg shells would be perfect for it.  The pale lavender matched beautifully.  I added some powdered rose petal and the color is stunning! 

 

I guess you could say I tinted them with roses.  :)

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