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#1 Kera

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:42 AM

Hi Everyone......looking for some more advice :) I have been reading through this website daily, and I think I am starting to understand what Traditional Witchcraft is all about, on a very basic level, mind you, as I am really new at this. Anyway I've read that it is not easy to obtain books on Traditional, and I can understand this. However, can anyone please help me get started? I need some form of reference for guidance. I truly don't want Wiccan, but I can't find to many books or people to help me start. I did find these books, but I want opinions, if you don't mind... on them before I buy them. Ok, here goes

1) The Good Spell by Gillian Kemp (Not sure if I can even get my hands on this one)
2) Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes
4) The Field
5) Wandering by Evan Twede

Any advice, references, web links ect would be soooo very appreciated. I want to start practicing, but I want it to be Traditional. If anyone is into British Traditional, that is really the path I want explore.
I thank you all for any input.

Most Sincerely,
Kera

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#2 Michele

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:58 AM

Hi Everyone......looking for some more advice :smile: I have been reading through this website daily, and I think I am starting to understand what Traditional Witchcraft is all about, on a very basic level, mind you, as I am really new at this. Anyway I've read that it is not easy to obtain books on Traditional, and I can understand this. However, can anyone please help me get started? I need some form of reference for guidance. I truly don't want Wiccan, but I can't find to many books or people to help me start. I did find these books, but I want opinions, if you don't mind... on them before I buy them. Ok, here goes

1) The Good Spell by Gillian Kemp (Not sure if I can even get my hands on this one)
2) Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes
4) The Field
5) Wandering by Evan Twede

Any advice, references, web links ect would be soooo very appreciated. I want to start practicing, but I want it to be Traditional. If anyone is into British Traditional, that is really the path I want explore.
I thank you all for any input.

Most Sincerely,
Kera


I'd suggest browsing the book forum... it has a lot of reviews in it. I haven't read any of the above so I can't comment on them. Also, a great book is an Audubon (sp?) book on the flora and animals of your area. If you're interested in BTW do they have any books on the specific nature of the land they work with? Perhaps a book on the plants common to that land?

M

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#3 Lela

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 02:17 AM

Check out this list of books by Ancestral Celt in the Needing Good Books!! thread.
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#4 Kera

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 03:21 AM

Thank you all for your help, really, really, appreciated and I will check out all or your suggestions. I just read a fabulous article and I think I am going to buy her book...
Melusini Draco, she is a Traditional British Witch and put out a series of books on how to practice Traditional Craft in an Urban Setting as well as by the Sea Shore and Fields and Hedges. Goes into how to practice within todays busy environments and lifestyles.
Thank you again Ladies!
Kera

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#5 Kera

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 03:23 AM

Check out this list of books by Ancestral Celt in the Needing Good Books!! thread.

Wow, that's quite a list! Thank you Lela!!! You won't be hearing from me for awhile with that list :) Thanks again

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Why Pamper Life's Complexities When the Leather Runs Smooth On The Passenger Seat -Morrissey

#6 Jevne

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 03:40 AM

Thank you all for your help, really, really, appreciated and I will check out all or your suggestions. I just read a fabulous article and I think I am going to buy her book...
Melusini Draco . . .


Mmmmm :thinking: . . . there are several discussions and reviews on these books (and other books) on the forum.

:coffee:

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#7 Babooshka

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 09:17 AM

Although not specifically about TW, the element encyclopedia book of spells is great as reference purely because it draws from a wide range of cultural backgrounds from hoodoo to wicca. It can be a handy book to leaf through and is good if you want a spark of inspiration.
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#8 Michele

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 12:40 PM

Although not specifically about TW, the element encyclopedia book of spells is great as reference purely because it draws from a wide range of cultural backgrounds from hoodoo to wicca. It can be a handy book to leaf through and is good if you want a spark of inspiration.


This is weird as - although I don't really have a use for "spell books" - this to me is one reason I would not use that book... it has no consistent cultural base so any spell derived from it would be (to me) a mishmash of differing ways that have no relation to each other. And I think that would make a mishmashed confusing spell... But I've also never read the book, lol lol.

M

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#9 brea

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 12:57 PM

2 books that I would recommend that aren't on the Celt's list are Call of the Horned Piper by Nigel Jackson and Paul Huson's Mastering Witchcraft. Huson recommends starting out by saying the Lord's Prayer backwards. I always find that little test to be very revealing :).

Brea

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#10 Michele

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:10 PM

2 books that I would recommend that aren't on the Celt's list are Call of the Horned Piper by Nigel Jackson and Paul Huson's Mastering Witchcraft. Huson recommends starting out by saying the Lord's Prayer backwards. I always find that little test to be very revealing :smile:.

Brea


lol!!

M

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#11 Babooshka

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:58 PM

This is weird as - although I don't really have a use for "spell books" - this to me is one reason I would not use that book... it has no consistent cultural base so any spell derived from it would be (to me) a mishmash of differing ways that have no relation to each other. And I think that would make a mishmashed confusing spell... But I've also never read the book, lol lol.

M


It would be a problem for me too, however the author often makes it clear where the spell has come from. Its not as if each individual spell is pieced together from different traditions, like some cultural Frankenstein, each spell stands alone, in its own cultural context, in its own right. I think it can be a good comparison, too see if you like the feel of things personally :)

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#12 Oneironaut

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 04:16 PM

2 books that I would recommend that aren't on the Celt's list are Call of the Horned Piper by Nigel Jackson and Paul Huson's Mastering Witchcraft. Huson recommends starting out by saying the Lord's Prayer backwards. I always find that little test to be very revealing :).

Brea


This was actually a deterrent for me when I first read "Mastering Witchcraft", and not because of any concern of retribution. Not being raised as a Christian, the Lord's Prayer had zero meaning for me regardless of how it was read (forward or backward, in English or Latin). As such, I originally couln't take it seriously as the reversed Lord's Prayer conjured up images of Anton LaVey in his heyday of red hoodies and plastic horns, lol. Only because it was suggested to me by someone whose opinion I trusted did I not put the book down at Chapter 1.

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#13 Apryl

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 10:33 PM

There are several reviews on many of the books you listed here on the forum, some I have read, some I have not. I'm the type to read something and separate what I can use and discard the rest (I call it separating the bullshit from the ice cream). You're not going to find a complete "how to" anywhere (and if you do, it's wicca) but I have gotten something out of most of the things I read, even if it was what not to do. Some things will resonate with you and some won't. I read Mastering Witchcraft as well as the Judika Ilkes book. They were interesting enough for what they are and none to be taken too literally, IMO.

My best suggestion echos what you've already been told, check out the books reviewed on the forum but more so, read through the forum. Read Starting a Traditional Path and all of the others. You'll learn more from the discussions, IMO. Use the search feature. This is not a teaching site but there is much to learn for those who wish to.

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#14 Whiterose

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:06 AM

You would be surprised the tidbits you would find in "non witchcraft" books. Check out your library, local used book store or thrift shop. You can find some cheap gems there.

Here is a pic of our hometown bookstore. I have found tons of gems among the tomes there. Don't limit yourself to a select few books or even authors.
[attachment=3194:Hometown Bookstore.jpg]

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#15 The Exile

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:38 AM

That library looks full of books. Yes i agree that a lot of stuff can be found in different type of books.
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#16 Whiterose

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 01:31 PM

That library looks full of books. Yes i agree that a lot of stuff can be found in different type of books.


(There is a whole other level in the basement and more behind me. I love digging for good books...but I'm a dork like that. :) )

Edited by Whiterose, 14 February 2013 - 01:32 PM.

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#17 Lela

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 01:44 AM

I'm the type to read something and separate what I can use and discard the rest (I call it separating the bullshit from the ice cream). You're not going to find a complete "how to" anywhere (and if you do, it's wicca) but I have gotten something out of most of the things I read, even if it was what not to do. Some things will resonate with you and some won't.


I couldn't agree with you more on this. There is no one book that is going to outline a complete Traditional Witchcraft practice from A-Z, like a Scott Cunningham book. You can read 1,000 books on the subject, but you're only going to find out what works for you and what doesn't by trial and error.

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#18 The Exile

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 02:14 AM

When I am doing researches for history on the witches, I find myself using different type of books, newspapers, magazines, directories, etc.

Folklore stuff is the best too.

Concerning reading non witch books, sometimes I read things in the past and it is just an article or a story. But now that I am more aware of the Witch World or the "Other World", I find myself reading stuff sometimes and something in the article would make me cock my head to the side and make me think "this person must of been a witch or one of us".

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#19 sarasuperid

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 11:26 PM

It kinda depends on what kind of traditional witchcraft you are interested in. If you want secular witchcraft, then I recommend Melusine Draco. If you are interested in traditions that do have gods there are many more books. I like Call of the Horned Piper and Treading the Mill a lot. I also like Mastering Witchcraft, Irish Witchcraft from and Irish Witch and Black Toad. 50 years in the Feri Tradition and the Robert Cochrane letters. That gives some variety.
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#20 Grymdycche

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 06:09 PM

If you're referring to "The Field" by Lynne McTaggart, it's not a witchcraft or even an occult book, per se, it fits more into the parapsychology/new age genre. Which is fine, just so long as you know that.
I've got it, and it's okay, (I don't like the section on homeopathy personally) but I think the best book along those lines is, "The Science of the Craft" by William Keith. It's a really good read if you're an inquisitive type who enjoys scientific conjecture as to how magic works.

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