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THE BOSS by Abigail Barnette - BDSM/Romance


Evergreen47

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Okay, so I follow the blog of romance writer Jennifer Armintrout (aka Abigail Barnette aka Jenny Trout). I got hooked on her because she writes hilarious chapter-by-chapter recaps of 50 Shades of Grey, which I think are total dreck (but that's neither here nor there).

 

Her main issues with 50 Shades are: she doesn't believe it accurately, or sexily, portrays a healthy BDSM relationship, and she thinks it has some real misogynistic overtones. So, she has taken up a challenge to write a non-misogynistic, SUPER HOT, accurate, BDSM-centered novel. She will release a chapter every two weeks until it is finished on her author-blog: http://abigailbarnet...s.blogspot.com/

 

Since I am a fan, I volunteered to be part of her "street team" and help spread the novel by word of mouth. I get chapters one week early as incentive, and I get to feel "important." :wink:

 

Chapter one is posted. Chapter two comes out next week. I just finished reading my advanced copy of Chapter two.... totally. fucking. hot. No lie.

 

So, I thought I would share here with anyone who is interested. It's not witchy/supernatural (though the author does write supernatural romance novels as part of her day job), but it's completely amazeballs nonetheless.

 

If you like romance: this is your thing.

 

If you like BDSM: this is your thing.

 

If you end up reading it, I'd love to hear your thoughts and discuss the chapters as they come out on this thread. Let me know what you think! At the very least, hey! FREE BOOK! :biggrin:

 

Here's the blurb about the plot so you can see if you're interested:

 

 

Sophie Scaife almost ran away once, trading her ticket to college for a ticket to Tokyo. But a delayed flight and one incredibly hot night with a stranger changed her mind, putting her firmly on track to a degree and a career at a New York fashion magazine.

 

Six years later, she’s shocked to find that irresistible stranger is now her boss, billionaire Neil Elwood. And Sophie can’t stop thinking about their one amazing night.

 

But Neil has eccentric tastes, and he wants to be sure Sophie can handle them. Sophie will have to prove she’s his match both at work and at play, and surrender to her Master’s every erotic whim.

 

Torn between their professional duties and their sensual desires, Sophie and Neil embark on a journey into their darkest sexual fantasies. But when Sophie gets the chance of a lifetime, will she follow her dreams, or her heart?

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I'm not sure why the author feels the need to come out with "better than 50 Shades BDSM erotic romance" just for the sake of having it. There are plenty of authors out there already. My fear is that something like this is going to turn into more of the "you're only truly a strong woman if you are college and career oriented" which lends to it's own sort of elitism and still is trying to tell women what to do. Don't get me wrong, I am no fan of 50 Shades but in trying to show what BDSM "really is" too many people have made the mistake of narrowing in on only some aspects and leaving others in the dark in order to pander to current societal expectations of the "strong independent woman who wants the career and the standing" which I don't find very helpful to BDSM or women as a whole. I guess I'll just have to wait and see where this is headed but the above is how these conversations tend to go and it drives me up a wall. (/random but related vent)

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I know from reading the recaps that it's not at all about the college/career issue. Her issue with Ana in 50SoG is more centered around her complete lack of self-knowledge on a sensual level and her approach to sex that is terribly immature.... and I quite agree with her stance on that. In 50SoG, Ana is a 22 year old virgin. Nothing wrong with that, but we're also to believe that she 1) has never had a sexual thought and 2) has never even been CURIOUS about sex. She approaches sex with Grey from a child-like place that makes me very uncomfortable (and not in a good way), and then remains willfully ignorant and even ashamed of her own body as their relationship continues.

 

50SoG is trumpeted at some sort of "feminist victory," but it's disturbingly misogynistic in my view. *shrug*

 

 

Oh, and I totally get where you're coming from, but I think you'll be pleasantly surprised. ;)

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And I don't believe it's "just for the sake of having it." She wanted to use the basic framework of 50SoG (older, more experienced man/younger woman) and write it differently is all. Much of her other work has BDSM themes as well.

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Ah, good to hear! I have yet to see 50 Shades being touted as some feminist victory; in fact I have only seen the opposite and have seen how people have taken it and used it as more fodder against submissive women which really chaps my hide. 50 Shades is about as feminist as Twilight (which, for those who don't know, is what 50 Shades is- Twilight fanfic with the names changed). Both can be used as manuals "How to Spot an Abusive Relationship 101"

 

And I don't believe it's "just for the sake of having it." She wanted to use the basic framework of 50SoG (older, more experienced man/younger woman) and write it differently is all. Much of her other work has BDSM themes as well.

 

Nearly every BDSM erotic novel I have read has that premise. LOL

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Ah, good to hear! I have yet to see 50 Shades being touted as some feminist victory; in fact I have only seen the opposite and have seen how people have taken it and used it as more fodder against submissive women which really chaps my hide. 50 Shades is about as feminist as Twilight (which, for those who don't know, is what 50 Shades is- Twilight fanfic with the names changed). Both can be used as manuals "How to Spot an Abusive Relationship 101"

 

 

Dude... word... But there are those who are saying 50SoG is awesome, revelatory, and all about YAY, WOMAN!! It's scary really... here's just ONE example of that: http://politicalfibe...-wave-feminism/

 

I know that's just a blog, but I couldn't find the Newsweek article calling the tripe "feminist." I think it was from an issue out last March-ish... gross....

 

And, true, about the premise. :smile:

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I know from reading the recaps that it's not at all about the college/career issue. Her issue with Ana in 50SoG is more centered around her complete lack of self-knowledge on a sensual level and her approach to sex that is terribly immature.... and I quite agree with her stance on that. In 50SoG, Ana is a 22 year old virgin. Nothing wrong with that, but we're also to believe that she 1) has never had a sexual thought and 2) has never even been CURIOUS about sex. She approaches sex with Grey from a child-like place that makes me very uncomfortable (and not in a good way), and then remains willfully ignorant and even ashamed of her own body as their relationship continues.

 

50SoG is trumpeted at some sort of "feminist victory," but it's disturbingly misogynistic in my view. *shrug*

 

 

Oh, and I totally get where you're coming from, but I think you'll be pleasantly surprised. :wink:

 

I agree with this and the opening post about Ana and Christian's relationship not being a healthy sexual one. This bothered me as about 80% of it is what I went through during a time of sexual abuse as a teen. I do not think these fringe topics should be mainstream and it bothers me that these authors that are portraying unhealthy female/male relationships are gaining so much popularity (twilight series, 50 Shades of Grey just off the top of my head). I can only imagine what damage a novel like this does to a young teen girl in the relationship department who thinks men like this are the new Prince Charming. In any case, I do love romance novels, so I may check this out at a latter date, granted it doesn't take me Ana's Steele's mind under a different name.

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I was just thinking how the crappy versions of fringe things always are the ones to gain in popularity. Even in the craft.

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I was just thinking how the crappy versions of fringe things always are the ones to gain in popularity. Even in the craft.

 

Definitely!

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I just read it and its really good, I am not sure how I'm going to deal with taking it one chapter at a time because I like to read books in one big gulp. Besides that though this is already far better written than 50 shades which I read mostly because I had tons of friends raving about it and one of them loaned them to me. I really like the characters already and am looking forward to chapter 2.

 

Btw totally funny that she flipped the food thing, that drove me nuts in 50 shades lol.

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I was just thinking how the crappy versions of fringe things always are the ones to gain in popularity. Even in the craft.

 

Really says something about general humanity doesn't it? lol

 

Thanks for the heads up on the book EG!

 

I guess I'm going to have to read 50shades so I'll be able to enjoy the parody breakdown on her blog. :wink:

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I guess I'm going to have to read 50shades so I'll be able to enjoy the parody breakdown on her blog. :wink:

 

You don't have to torture yourself by reading 50SoG to enjoy her blogs, I promise! But... if you're INTO torture.... No, I still wouldn't recommend reading the books... :smile:

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You don't have to torture yourself by reading 50SoG to enjoy her blogs, I promise! But... if you're INTO torture.... No, I still wouldn't recommend reading the books... :smile:

 

I do like some torture ;) Just usually not through my books lol

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LMAO I'm reading my way through the 50SoG recaps - only on chapter 2 of them so far but I'm in hysterics :roflhard:

 

I prefer a few chapters at once when it comes to reading so I'll wait a few weeks before I start on her novel :) Thanks for linking.

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This sort of says it perfectly. I'm a Buffy girl, this is where I grew up. I get kind of wound up when people tout the excellence of 50 Shades of Grey because quite frankly the book is rubbish (my opinion), it is not well written, shows misogyny as normal and does nothing but encourage women to be submissive, insecure twits that cowtow to the opinion of a man. It really is abusive relationships 101. Apparently there is a trend of teenage girls reading this crap and thinking it is the norm for relationships and that is very disturbing. It's time like this I am glad I don't have (or plan to have) kids because with role models like this, what hope is there?

 

Do you know, I couldn't even get half way through 50SoG before I stopped reading it, I couldn't take anymore!!

 

Ok rant over, but like I said, the picture below shows the difference between those of us who grew up in the Buffy generation and those who are growing up in the Twilight gen.

 

 

Total Buffy Girl

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And THAT is why I own all seven seasons of Buffy on DVD and watch 'em all about every two years or so.... ;)

 

I also love this quote from Stephen King, who I LOVE, about Twilight: "Harry Potter is about confronting fears, finding inner strength and doing

what is right in the face of adversity. Twilight is about how important it

is to have a boyfriend."

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Slightly unrelated rant but... I don't get why every book that has a romance seems to be judged on the basis of the "message it sends to women". Some stuff is just written for entertainment, nothing more. I mean, LIFE doesn't always send a 'good' message women or men for that matter, why should all fiction be required to? meh.

/rant

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Slightly unrelated rant but... I don't get why every book that has a romance seems to be judged on the basis of the "message it sends to women". Some stuff is just written for entertainment, nothing more. I mean, LIFE doesn't always send a 'good' message women or men for that matter, why should all fiction be required to? meh.

/rant

 

+1

 

It kills me that we still are seen as needing to be coddled and preached to. So we get rid of men telling us what to do and how to feel and acting as if we are delicate little flowers who have to be given instructions on how to properly live our lives and trade it for other women saying the same to us, just in a new package? Makes no sense.

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Slightly unrelated rant but... I don't get why every book that has a romance seems to be judged on the basis of the "message it sends to women". Some stuff is just written for entertainment, nothing more. I mean, LIFE doesn't always send a 'good' message women or men for that matter, why should all fiction be required to? meh.

/rant

I definitely agree. The reason I disliked, and laughed at, 50SoG was because it was so badly written and I disliked the main character so much because she was so vapid. The "message it sends to women" didn't even come into it, although I'm enjoying reading these recaps. So yeah, I definitely agree that fiction books should just be seen as such, fiction, and not how-to-live-your-life handbooks.

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In regards to the Jezebel article, I think that this late "Austen-mania" is missing the key importance of Austen, and it's a terrible oversimplification of the the character of Fitzwilliam Darcy to say, "It sounds more impressive to say you're obsessed with Mr. Darcy than Edward Cullen or Christian Grey, but let's be real: all three heroes are famously swoonworthy because they're arrogant, aloof babes who are secretly sensitive and end up saving the day when they're unexpectedly overcome by love." By the end of the novel, Darcy's pride is actually revealed to be 1) almost completely justified and 2) a result of some serious shit from his youth. He is guarded because of his past experiences, but it's not Elizabeth's "love" that saves him. Elizabeth finally realizing that she's sort of a judgemental bitch is what ultimately makes the love work. I think that's a big problem with modern heroine's who "save" their men with the magic of love and their vagina: that implies that it's unfair to call a spade a spade. Sometimes and asshole is just an asshole -- nothing deeper.

 

On the surface, yes, Austen is all about love and happy endings, but her main subject is the role of women in the household and society and the social stratification based on class in early 19th century England. She wrote novels that people would enjoy and want to read in order to disseminate her deeper viewpoints on what she saw as injustices. And what the writer at Jezebel is missing is: though Austen's female characters could be one-dimensional (I find this more true for the supporting female cast, not the main character), they also paved the way for women writers in general (particularly the Brontes, whom the article's author loves.... gag!) to feature multi-layered female leads (the first novel I can really think of with a complex female lead character is Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe in the 18th century, but I don't view Moll as even being near the same level as Elizabeth Bennett or Anne Elliot).

 

I really wish that people would stop comparing Austen to Meyer, but the reason it happens it because Meyer has said that Twilight is an homage to Pride and Prejudice (just like New Moon is supposed to be based on Romeo and Juliet).

 

All in all, a very interesting article Marabet. Thank you for sharing! :smile:

 

Edited for my insane rambling causing numerous grammatical errors... sometimes it's not wise to get the English major into a literature debate... lol... at least my degree helps me with something, right? :wink:

 

OH! Also, I should have just noticed that this article falls under the Betteridge Law of Journalism. Betteridge's Law says, "Any headline that takes the form of a question can usually be answered with "No." So, "Is Jane Austen So Popular Because Her Books Are Kinda Just Highbrow Twilight?" Short answer: No. :D

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